Courses

Fall 2019 Course List

Gateway Course: Constitutionalism, Law & Politics II:  American Constitutionalism
CNST 50002  (CRN 15991) |  POLS 30665 (CRN 15994)  |  Phillip Muñoz  |  T R 12:30 – 1:45pm

Elective Course offerings for Fall 2019:

Electives are divided by topic for organizational purposes only.  Students may take electives from any category. Click heading for course descriptions.

American Founding & American Constitutional History

COURSE TITLE CNST# CNST CRN PRIMARY# PRIMARY CRN INSTRUCTOR SCHEDULE ROOM
American Politics CNST 20002 13867 POLS 20100-01 11493 Layman, Geoffrey MW 2pm-2:50pm Hesburgh Library 107
Topics in Civil Liberties and Civil Rights CNST 30006 19752 POLS 30068-01 19751 Hall, Matthew TTh 2pm-3:15pm DeBartolo Hall 213
American Political Parties CNST 30013 16591 POLS 30010-01 16598 Wolbrecht, Christina MW 11am-12:15pm DeBartolo Hall 210
Lincoln, Slavery, Civil War CNST 30021 20358 HIST 30671-01 19840 Lundberg, James TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 106
The American Constitution CNST 30022 20359 HIST 30621-01 19826 To Be Determined TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 106
Jr.Sem: The Divided States of Amerixa     POLS 43001-04 15836 Campbell, David MW 3:30-4:45pm  
SrSem: Southern Politics     POLS 53001-08 16609 Kaplan, Joshua TR 12:30-1:45pm  

Comparative Constitutionalism & International Law

COURSE TITLE CNST# CNST CRN PRIMARY# PRIMARY CRN INSTRUCTOR SCHEDULE ROOM
World Politics: Intro to Comp CNST 20200 13868 POLS 20400-01 11537 Schiumerini, Luis MW 2pm-2:50pm DeBartolo Hall 141
European Politics CNST 30203 15883 POLS 30421-01 15097 Gould, Andrew TTh 11am-12:15pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 109
Modern France CNST 30204 19813 HIST 30454-01 16061 Shortall, Sarah TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 207
International Criminal Justice CNST 30211 15884 POLS 30222-01 15834 Reydams, Luc MW 2pm-3:15pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B071
Comparative Law CNST 30212 19765 POLS 30224-01 19764 Powell, Emilia Justyna TTh 11am-12:15pm DeBartolo Hall 320
Pol. of Irish Const. 1937-2019 CNST 30230 20378 POLS 30530-01 20237 Murphy, Gary TTh 5:05pm-6:20pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B062
Election/Soc Protest Latin Amr CNST 30232 20377 POLS 30406-01 19766 Trejo, Guillermo MW 11am-12:15pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 109
Middle-East Politics CNST 30233 19768 POLS 30441-01 19767 Hoffman, Michael MW 11am-12:15pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 117

Constitutional Government & Public Policy

COURSE TITLE CNST# CNST CRN PRIMARY# PRIMARY CRN INSTRUCTOR SCHEDULE ROOM
Medical Ethics CNST 20400 19983 PHIL 20602-01 10141 Warfield, Ted MW 12:50pm-1:40pm Hesburgh Library 107
Introduction to Criminology CNST 20403 15882 SOC 20732-01 12350 To Be Determined MW 11am-12:15pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 242
Introduction to Public Policy CNST 20405 20511 HESB 20010-01 20504 Kaplan, Joshua TTh 11am-12:15pm DeBartolo Hall 214
Education Law and Policy CNST 30402 15885 ESS 30605-01 15833 Schoenig, John MW 3:30pm-4:45pm DeBartolo Hall 202
Gay Rights & the Constitution CNST 30406 19755 POLS 30071-01 19754 Barber, Sotirios TTh 11am-12:15pm DeBartolo Hall 120
Constitutional Law: Powers & Institutions CNST 30407 20361 POLS 30073-01 19758 Garnett, Richard TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm DeBartolo Hall 333
History of American Capitalism CNST 30414 19471 AMST 30108-01 19469 Garibaldi, Korey TTh 2pm-3:15pm Main Building 404
Cybercrime and the Law CNST 30420 17373 CDT 40220-01 15066 Tamashasky, Eric TTh 11am-12:15pm Corbett Family Hall E720
Philanthropy: Society & Common Good CNST 30423 20360 HESB 30348-01 19548 Hannah, Jonathan TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm DeBartolo Hall 203
Constitutional Conflicts in Representative Democracy CNST 30424 20354 POLS 30125-01 19759 Kwakwa, Maryann TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B079
Intro to Economics &Catholic Thought CNST 33400 - ECON33150 – 01 19621 Kaboski, Joseph M W – 2:00P – 3:15P Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B058
Intro to Economics &Catholic Thought CNST 33400 - ECON33150 – 02 19622 Kaboski, Joseph M W – 12:30P – 1:45P Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B058
International Migration & Human Rights CNST 43400 20680 SOC 43479 20668 Bustamente, Jorge T R – 3:30P – 4:45P Departmental Space
Labor Law - - ECON43410 14140 Leahy, William T R – 9:30A – 10:45A DeBartolo Hall 149

Constitutional History and Philosophy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





COURSE TITLE CNST# CNST CRN PRIMARY# PRIMARY CRN INSTRUCTOR SCHEDULE ROOM
Political Theory CNST 20602 15704 POLS 20600-01 15826 Villa, Dana MW 12:50pm-1:40pm DeBartolo Hall 126
Theology, Ethics, and Business CNST 20608 15987 THEO 20639-01 15193 Akesseh, Ebenezer MWF 9:25am-10:15am DeBartolo Hall 205
The Church and Empire CNST 20609 15297 THEO 20843-01 14586 Battin, Steven TTh 2pm-3:15pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 109
Roman History I: The Republic CNST 20613 20357 CLAS 20202-01 19922 Grillo, Luca MW 12:50pm-1:40pm DeBartolo Hall 118
Politics and Conscience CNST 30602 15886 POLS 30653-01 15716 Keys, Mary MW 2pm-3:15pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B062
Tudor England: Politics & Honor CNST 30604 19808 HIST 30410-01 19807 Rapple, Rory TTh 9:30am-10:45am Corbett Family Hall E202
US Gilded Age/Progressive Era CNST 30629 17377 HIST 30606-01 16574 McKenna, Rebecca MW 11am-12:15pm Hammes Mowbray Hall 319
Ancient Politics and Law CNST 30636 20355 POLS 30722-01 19770 Gondelman, Jonathan MW 12:30pm-1:45pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B071
Political Lessons of Rome CNST 30637 20356 POLS 30723-01 19771 Mitchell, Colleen TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B044
Intro to Phil: Ethics & Politics - - PHIL10105 – 01 14506 Sterba, James M W F – 2:00P – 2:50P Crowley Hall 108
Intro to Phil: Ethics & Politics - - PHIL10105 – 02 20533 Jech, Alexander T R – 9:30A – 10:45A Crowley Hall 107
Intro to Phil: Ethics & Politics - - PHIL10105 – 03 20536 Jech, Alexander T R – 11:00A – 12:15P Crowley Hall 107
Intro to Phil: Ethics & Politics - - PHIL10105 – 04 20400 von Eschenbach, Warren T R – 3:30P – 4:45P Crowley Hall 107
Environmental Ethics & Politics - - PHIL20609 – 01 19985 Hosle, Vittorio T R – 3:30P – 4:45P O’Shaughnessy Hall 116
Environmental Ethics & Politics - - PHIL20609 – 02 20430 Hosle, Vittorio T R – 3:30P – 4:45P O’Shaughnessy Hall 116
Environmental Ethics & Politics - - PHIL20609 – 03 20431 Hosle, Vittorio T R – 3:30P – 4:45P O’Shaughnessy Hall 116

USEM: Democracy and Religion

   


POLS 13181-02

12622 Gould, Andrew TR 12:30-1:45pm  

Updated 4.4.19

Course Descriptions

American Founding & American Constitutional History


American Politics | CNST 20002 – 13867 | POLS 20100-01 – 11493
Layman, Geoffrey | MW 2pm-2:50pm | Hesburgh Library 107                 

This course surveys the basic institutions and practices of American politics. The goal of the course is to gain a more systematic understanding of American politics that will help you become better informed and more articulate. The course examines the institutional and constitutional framework of American politics and identifies the key ideas needed to understand politics today. The reading and writing assignments have been designed not only to inform you, but also to help develop your analytic and research skills. The themes of the course include the logic and consequences of the separation of powers, the build-in biases of institutions and procedures, the origins and consequence of political reforms, and recent changes in American politics in the 21st century. This semester we will emphasize the significance of the upcoming 2016 elections, and the course will include election-related assignments. Although the course counts toward the Political Science major and will prepare prospective majors for further study of American politics, its primary aim is to introduce students of all backgrounds and interests to the information, ideas, and academic skills that will enable them to understand American politics better and help them become more thoughtful and responsible citizens.                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

 

Topics in Civil Liberties and Civil Rights | CNST 30006 – 19752 | POLS 30068-01 – 19751
Hall, Matthew | TTh 2pm-3:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 213
                
This course explores topics in American constitutional law related to civil liberties and civil rights. The course employs a variety of instructional methods including Socratic method lectures, class debates, and moot court exercises in which students play the role of lawyers and justices arguing a Supreme Court case. Students will explore the social and political struggles that have shaped freedom and equality in the United States, including debates over protest, hate speech, pornography, religious freedom, gun control, abortion, race, gender, and homosexuality.

 

American Political Parties | CNST 30013 – 16591 | POLS 30010-01 – 16598          
Wolbrecht, Christina | MW 11am-12:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 210             

Political parties play many vital roles in American politics: They educate potential voters about political processes, policy issues, and civic duties. They mobilize citizens into political activity and involvement. They provide vital information about public debates. They control the choices—candidates and platforms that voters face at the ballot box. They influence and organize the activities of government officials. Most importantly, by providing a link between government and the governed, they are a central mechanism of representation. These roles—how well they are performed, what bias exists, how they shape outcomes, how they have changed over time—have consequences for the working of the American political system.

 

Lincoln, Slavery, Civil War | CNST 30021 – 20358 | HIST 30671-01 – 19840
Lundberg, James | TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 106                     

This course asks how we should narrate and understand the great ordeal of Civil War and emancipation. Reading both primary and secondary sources, it considers the Civil War era and life of Abraham Lincoln in light of the rise of abolition and antislavery politics; attitudes toward race, slavery, and labor; the political and social meanings of war and emancipation; the political and social challenge of reconstructing the nation amidst the tangled legacies of racial slavery and a destructive war.

 

The American Constitution | CNST 30022 – 20359 | HIST 30621-01 – 19826
To Be Determined | TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 106

The Constitution holds a unique place in American law and political culture. Not only is it the basis of the federal government, it provides the framework for political debates about all manner of controversial issues in modern America. Today, there is much talk of a “constitutional crisis” in the United States. What does this mean? How can a history help us make sense of the Constitution and of our politics? This course explores the historical context in which the American Constitution was framed, ratified, and amended over time. Together, we will ask and answer the questions of how and why it was written the way it was; how and why it gained legitimacy; and how it was put into practice and interpreted over time. The class will introduce students to central historical problems, which include: Is the American Constitution democratic? Did the Constitution codify slavery into law? Is originalism a useful and valid way to interpret the Constitution? Course readings will consist primarily of primary source material, though students will also read historical interpretations of the Constitution and the process of forming, amending, and interpreting it. The discussion-based class will empower students to think historically about the American Constitution by interpreting primary source material, building arguments about causes and effects of particular constitutional points, and intervening in scholarly dialogues about the founding and its legacy. Students will be evaluated primarily based on class participation, a short primary source analysis, a role-play activity, and a final paper.

 

Jr.Sem: The Divided States of America  | POLS 43001-04 – 15836
Campbell, David | MW 3:30-4:45pm
                       
In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, it might appear that America is a house divided against itself. The seminar seeks to understand both the causes and consequences of America’s divisions, and ask whether this “house divided” can continue to stand. We will start with J.D. Vance’s bestselling memoir Hillbilly Elegy, which provides a first-hand account of both the economic and cultural tensions that have fueled the estrangement of many working-class Americans. From there, our class will explore both class and culture as causes of division, and examine the rise of populism as a political response. Students who take this course should expect to question their assumptions about what does, and does not, pull Americans apart—as well as what brings them together.                                                                                      

 

SrSem: Southern Politics | POLS 53001-08 – 16609
Kaplan, Joshua | TR 12:30-1:45pm

This course has two objectives. The first is to study the role of the South in national politics

as a way to understand American politics more generally. The second is to use studies of

Southern politics as a way to understand American political science and the study of politics

more generally. The course also includes segments on the role of the South in various

aspects of American politics, including the South and the New Deal, the influence of

southerners in Congress, and the role of the South in Presidential elections. This semester

we will pay special attention to the implications of the recent elections for the future of the

American party system. The course will also help you develop your own research skills, in

part by this introduction to the political science of the South, and also through assignments

that encourage you to pose questions about American politics and consider ways to answer

them.

 


Comparative Constitutionalism & International Law


World Politics: Intro to Comp | CNST 20200 – 13868 | POLS 20400-01 – 11537

Schiumerini, Luis | MW 2pm-2:50pm | DeBartolo Hall 141
This course will focus on the relationship between democratic institutions, peace, and economic/human development. While drawing on lessons from North America and Europe, we will focus largely on countries of Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. During the semester, we will discuss and debate the merits of various explanations or hypotheses that political scientists have proposed to answer the following questions: Why are some countries more “developed” and democratic than others? Is development necessary for democracy or democracy necessary for development? What is the relationship between culture, development, and democracy? How do different types of political institutions affect the prospects for development and democracy? Should/how should U.S. and other established democracies promote democratization? By the end of the course, the objectives are that students (1) learn the most important theories intended to explain why some countries are more democratic and “developed” than others, (2) understand the complexity of any relationship between democracy and development, and (3) grow in the ability to think about and intelligently assess the strengths and weaknesses of strategies intended to promote democracy and development.

European Politics | CNST 30203 – 15883 | POLS 30421-01 – 15097
Gould, Andrew | TTh 11am-12:15pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 109

In this course on European politics we will examine the literature on three major issues: regional integration, origins of modern political authority, and industrial political economy. We will seek to understand the origin, current functioning, and possible futures for key European institutions, including the EU, nation-states, social provision, unions, and political parties. Readings on the European Union, monetary politics, Germany, France, and Spain will be drawn from both scholarly sources and contemporary analyses of political events.

 

Modern France | CNST 30204 – 19813 | HIST 30454-01 – 16061

Shortall, Sarah | TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 207

This course will survey the history of France in the 19th and 20th centuries and will balance attention to political and social developments with an interest in French culture. Themes will include: the revolutions of the 19th century that culminated in a democratic republic; industrialization and the persistence of the peasant ideal; changes in women’s roles, gender relations, and sexuality; colonialism and imperialism; victory in World War I; defeat and collaboration in World War II; the role of intellectuals in French social life; decolonization and postcolonialism; cultural and ethnic differences in contemporary France; and Franco-American relations. Students will develop an appreciation for the vitality of the French past and an understanding of the current role of France in Europe and the world. The format will be lectures supplemented by discussions, readings, and some films.

 

International Criminal Justice | CNST 30211 – 15884 | POLS 30222-01 – 15834

Reydams, Luc | MW 2pm-3:15pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B071

This course critically examines the phenomena of international judicial intervention and `criminalization of world politics’; the actors, ideas, and rationales behind the international criminal justice project; the operation of international criminal justice in a world of power politics; its accomplishments, failures, and financial costs; and the future of international criminal justice. The course includes Skype conferences with a war crimes investigator, a war crimes analyst, a defense counsel, a victim representative, a State Department official, and a staff member of the Coalition for the International Criminal Court.

 

Comparative Law | CNST 30212 – 19765 | POLS 30224-01 – 19764

Powell, Emilia Justyna | TTh 11am-12:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 320

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the main legal systems around the world. We will focus on the major legal traditions (present and past) such as the indigenous law, civil law, common law, Islamic law, Hindu law, and Asian law. We will concentrate on the history of each legal system, sources of law, and their main characteristics. In addition to the domestic legal systems, we will also examine the main features of international law, its history and sources. The course begins with a general discussion of what law is, how it develops, and where it comes from. Later sections of the course center on sources, features, and defining characteristics of each domestic legal tradition. Finally, we will analyze international law. Upon completion of this course, students should be familiar with the main features of major legal families present in the world today and in the past.

Pol. of Irish Const. 1937-2019 | CNST 30230 – 20378 | POLS 30530-01 – 20237

Murphy, Gary | TTh 5:05pm-6:20pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B062

This course will explore the politics of constitutional change in Ireland over the period from the enactment of the Constitution of the Irish Free State in 1922 to the present day, encompassing issues such as electoral reform, democratic accountability, institutional reform, the role of women, the relationship between Church and state, divorce, abortion and same-sex marriage. These in themselves, and to an extent independently of the issues involved, raise increasingly important theoretical and political questions about the relationship – and the tensions – between the institutions of representative democracy – especially the Constitution – and participatory democratic politics in a modern state. Case histories will be used to illustrate the theoretical issues involved.

 

Election/Soc Protest Latin Amr | CNST 30232 – 20377 | POLS 30406-01 – 19766
Trejo, Guillermo | MW 11am-12:15pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 109

Elections and social protest are the two most important means of political participation in Latin America today. Every year, millions of Latin Americans go to the ballot box to elect their representatives, but millions also march to their country’s capitals to oust elected politicians or simply to demand public goods or policy changes. Are Latin American citizens taking to the streets to contest market-oriented reforms, as it is often portrayed? Or do they take to the streets because elections don’t work in Latin America’s dysfunctional democracies? Are Latin American voters electing leftist politicians to move the economies away from neoliberal policies? Do the rich vote for the Right and the poor for the Left? In this course we want to understand who votes, who protests, and why they do it. We also want to understand the relationship between elections and protest. The course first provides a general overview of democratization, economic reforms, electoral behavior and social protest in Latin America. We then analyze electoral and social dynamics in six countries: Mexico, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Venezuela, and Guatemala. The in-depth analysis of these countries will provide you with a solid understanding of markets, democracies, voters and protesters in Latin America and will give you skills on how to assess public opinion surveys.

 

Middle-East Politics | CNST 30233 – 19768 | POLS 30441-01 – 19767
Hoffman, Michael | MW 11am-12:15pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 117         

The Middle East is simultaneously one of the most strategically important regions in the world and one of the least understood. This course provides an introduction to the politics of the region from a thematic perspective. It addresses a variety of topics, including democracy, development, sectarianism, oil, and conflict. Students will be assigned readings from both historical scholarship and contemporary analysis of regional issues. When applicable, cases from across the region will be used to illustrate the themes of the course.

 

Constitutional Government & Public Policy

 

Medical Ethics | CNST 20400 – 19983 | PHIL 20602-01 – 10141
Warfield, Ted | MW 12:50pm-1:40pm | Hesburgh Library 107

An exploration from the point of view of ethical theory of a number of ethical problems in contemporary biomedicine. Topics discussed will include euthanasia, abortion, the allocation of scarce medical resources, truth-telling in the doctor-patient relationship, the right to medical care and informed consent, and human experimentation.

 

Introduction to Criminology | CNST 20403 – 15882 | SOC 20732-01 – 12350
To Be Determined | MW 11am-12:15pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 242

Introduction to Criminology provides students with an overview of the sociological study of law making, law breaking and the resulting social responses. In this class we not only look at a variety of crimes, but we also discuss the varying methods sociologists use to collect, interpret and evaluate data, as well as how we theorize about crime and punishment. We address questions such as “Why are some people or groups labeled as criminal, while others are not?” “Do laws in both their construction and enforcement serve everyone’s interests equally?” “How can the communities in which people are embedded be considered as criminogenic?” “How are poverty, race, gender and other social factors related to crime?”

 

Introduction to Public Policy | CNST 20405 – 20511 | HESB 20010-01 – 20504

Kaplan, Joshua | TTh 11am-12:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 214
This course introduces students to fundamentals of public policy by examining the policy process as well as reviewing tools for policy assessment and analysis. In our exploration of the policymaking process, we will examine how government structure shapes that process, as well as the role and influence of various actors, including parties and special interests. Throughout the semester we will delve into substantive policy areas healthcare, immigration, economic and social policy. Students will have a group project to research a specific policy that is currently receiving significant national attention. This project will provide students an opportunity to learn and practice policy writing. The format of the course will be a mix of lecture, small group discussion and in-class activities. Grades will be based on exams, a group project, and participation.


Education Law and Policy |  CNST 30402 – 15885 | ESS 30605-01 – 5833
Schoenig, John | MW 3:30pm-4:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 202

This course focuses on selected legal and policy issues related to K-12 education in the United States. A central theme is the intersection of K-12 schooling and the state, with a particular focus on Constitutional issues of religious freedom and establishment, student speech and privacy, parental choice, educational opportunity, and education reform trends such as charter schools and accountability measures. Questions examined over the course of the semester include: What are the most basic obligations of the state with regard to its regulation of K-12 education? What are the most basic rights of parents in this regard? In what ways does the 1st Amendment protect – and limit – the speech and privacy rights of K-12 schoolchildren? In what ways may the state accommodate K-12 schools with an explicitly religious character? What are the Constitutional requirements with regard to religious speech or expression within K-12 public schools? To what degree is the principle of equality manifest in the form of educational opportunity? How has this changed over time? In what ways have education reform trends such as charter schooling and increased accountability changed the policy landscape of K-12 education?

Gay Rights & the Constitution | CNST 30406 – 19755 | POLS 30071-01 – 19754
Barber, Sotirios | TTh 11am-12:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 120          

This course will review decisions of the U.S. Supreme court regarding the constitutional rights of homosexuals. It will assess the Court’s decisions in light of (1) background theories of constitutional interpretation; (2) the principles of the American Founding; and (3) present day moral arguments for and against gay rights. Readings will consist of Supreme Court cases, selections from the Ratification debate and the philosophic writings that influenced the Founding, and the writings of present-day moral philosophers on both sides of the issues. Grades will be based on mid-term and final exams, with an optional term paper for one quarter of the course grade.

 

Constitutional Law: Powers & Institutions | CNST 30407 – 20361 | POLS 30073-01 – 19758
Garnett, Richard | TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 333

This course will examine constitutional law and interpretation in the United States, focusing on the division of powers and the authority of key institutions under the Constitution. We will consider the Court’s interpretation of the scope of power granted to Congress, the executive branch, and the federal judiciary, in addition to the powers reserved to the states. We will examine the ways in which constitutional interpretation of powers and authority has changed over time and gain an understanding of where the Court stands on these issues today. In each section we will discuss pivotal moments in interpretation, such as congressional power after the passage of the Fourteenth Amendment, the expansion of the commerce power during the New Deal, and the resurgence of state powers during the Rehnquist Court’s federalism revolution. We will also deal with cases currently before the Court, including those that involve the Affordable Care Act, and cases that will likely come before the Court, such as challenges to President Obama’s executive changes to immigration policy. This approach will help students to consider how political factors and the changing membership of the Court affect constitutional interpretation.

 

History of American Capitalism | CNST 30414 – 19471 | AMST 30108-01 – 19469
Garibaldi, Korey | TTh 2pm-3:15pm | Main Building 404

This course offers a broad thematic overview of the history of capitalism from the early sixteenth century up to the late 1980s. As a discussion-based seminar, we will devote most of our conversations to discovering, analyzing and reflecting on the transformation of the U.S. from a newly-independent British colony, to the most influential economic power in the world. Topics and themes we will consider include: the rise of early modern transnational capitalism, European imperialism and trade, and indigenous dispossession after 1492; science and technological transformations; social and economic thought; slavery and servitude, broadly construed; and characteristics of prosperity, wealth, and economic flux. Our readings and viewings will be a mix of scholarly and primary sources, including an abundance of canonical literary and artistic material, such as novels, visual art, and film excerpts (e.g. Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House (1879), Aaron Douglas’s Building More Stately Mansions (1944), and Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence (1920)). Over the course of the semester, students will draw upon this eclectic combination of sources to synthesize the dominant historical dimensions of capitalism in and beyond the U.S. via four short essays (4 – 5 pages, double-spaced-between 1,100 and 1,400 words), and a final paper (10 – 12 pages, double-spaced) based on cumulative texts.


Cybercrime and the Law | CNST 30420 – 17373 | CDT 40220-01 – 15066
Tamashasky, Eric | TTh 11am-12:15pm | Corbett Family Hall E720

Almost all crimes, or even human interactions, contain a digital component. The fact that “old” laws don’t always fit “new” problems is no more apparent than in the area of cybercrimes. This course will include discussion of topics including: the methodology of typical cyber investigations, the application of the Fourth Amendment to digital evidence, and different types of cyber-specific laws enforced today. The course will also focus on the responses of both courts and legislators to the ever-evolving issues presented by computer crimes.

 

Philanthropy: Society & Common Good | CNST 30423 – 20360 | HESB 30348-01 – 19548
Hannah, Jonathan | TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 203

This course will explore the roots of philanthropy in American society, the role philanthropy plays within the modern economy, and how philanthropic activity helps us create a better world and strive for the common good. The key component of the course requires students to act as a Board of Directors and use thoughtful analysis to award real grants to deserving nonprofits (a sum up to $50,000). Students are expected to come to each class prepared to discuss course readings, and to offer ideas and suggestions regarding the grant making process. Each student is also expected to complete two site visits to nonprofit organizations outside of normal class hours. Students will nominate nonprofits for awards and the class will systematically discuss, analyze, and ultimately vote to award the grants.

 

Constitutional Conflicts in Representative Democracy | CNST 30424 – 20354 | POLS 30125-01 – 19759
Kwakwa, Maryann | TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B079         

This course examines the sociopolitical impact of landmark Supreme Court cases. We will evaluate case law and empirical research related to gerrymandering, immigration, voter ID laws, and free speech. We will also discuss how public opinion shapes precedent and consider the extent to which policy preferences influence judicial decision-making.
 

Intro to Economics &Catholic Thought | CNST 33400 – CRN| ECON 33150 – 01 – 19621
Kaboski, Joseph | M W – 2:00P – 3:15P | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B058

 

Intro to Economics &Catholic Thought | CNST 33400 – CRN| ECON33150 – 02 – 19622
Kaboski, Joseph | M W – 12:30P – 1:45P | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B058

This course is the seminar version of 30150. In this course we will discuss the relationship between economics and Catholic social teaching. We will learn about key principles in Catholic social thought, read key Papal encyclicals and other writings. We will then discuss key economic concepts and empirical facts known from the field of economics, and how these relate to Catholic social teaching. Finally, we will apply these ideas to discussions on labor, capital, finance, the environment, globalization, and development

                       

International Migration & Human Rights | CNST 43400 – 20680 | SOC 43479 – 20668
Bustamente, Jorge | T R – 3:30P – 4:45P | Departmental Space

This course is an extension from the mini-course to a full term, with a wider coverage of international migration experiences in the world with an emphasis on human rights. It starts with a historical approach to various immigration waves to the United States, from the years of the Industrial Revolution to the present. It focuses on the current debate on the impact of the undocumented immigration from Mexico and Central America, with a discussion of the gap between public perceptions and research findings. Differences between Mexico and the United States’ migration policies, and its social and economic implications, are discussed. The recent developments within the context of the United Nations’ Commission of Human Rights on the relationship between migration and human rights are also covered.

 

Labor Law | ECON 43410 – 14140
Leahy, William | T R – 9:30A – 10:45A | DeBartolo Hall 149          

This course is the seminar version of ECON 30410. A study of the development of common and statutory law with reference to industrial relations in the United States with emphasis on the case method.

 

Constitutional History and Philosophy

 

Political Theory | CNST 20602 – 15704 | POLS 20600-01 – 15826
Villa, Dana | MW 12:50pm-1:40pm | DeBartolo Hall 126

This course is an introduction to political theory as a tradition of discourse and as a way of thinking about politics. The course surveys selected works of political theory and explores some of the recurring themes and questions that political theory addresses, especially the question of justice. This introductory course fulfils the political theory breadth requirement for the political science major.

 

Theology, Ethics, and Business | CNST 20608 – 15987 | THEO 20639-01 – 15193
Akesseh, Ebenezer | MWF 9:25am-10:15am | DeBartolo Hall 205
           
This course is intended to be an introduction to Catholic moral theology customized for those discerning a career as a business professional. In the wake of ethics failures at a number of prominent corporations, business leaders have renewed their call for ethical behavior and have begun to establish criteria for hiring morally thoughtful employees and to institute ethics education in the workplace. In the first part of the course, we will examine Catholic theological ideas about conscience and how it functions in the process of making a moral decision. In the second part of the course, we will examine a selection of Catholic writings on the idea of vocation and calling, as well as the nature of human work, the relationship between workers and management, and the norms of justice that ought to govern these relations. Finally we will examine ideas about character and virtue to assess the challenges and opportunities for moral formation in a business context. Class format will combine analysis of theological texts and discussion of business cases. Course requirements include a midterm and final examination and a group project.
 

The Church and Empire | CNST 20609 – 15297 | THEO 20843-01 – 14586 
Battin, Steven | TTh 2pm-3:15pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 109

The formation of Christians’ communal identity, theological imagination, and social practices have always been worked out – whether implicitly or explicitly – in relation to empire. This course explores this complex theological and historical relationship between Church and empire with particular attention to the ways Christian communities have attempted to resist the onslaught of pre-modern and modern imperialism in order to preserve the integrity of various aspects of the gospel of Christ. In the process of this exploration we will attempt, as a class, to discern some general characteristics of a counter-imperial Catholic ethos or spirituality by paying close attention to the ways the Church has compromised, negotiated, or resisted empire concerning images of Jesus, the effects of baptism, the scope of Christ’s Eucharistic presence, and the legitimate modes of evangelization at the Church’s disposal.
 

Roman History I: The Republic | CNST 20613 – 20357 | CLAS 20202-01 – 19922
Grillo, Luca | MW 12:50pm-1:40pm | DeBartolo Hall 118

We will use ancient sources, material evidence and modern scholarship to attempt and reconstruct the first seven centuries of Roman history, broadly speaking, from the foundation of Rome (and the murder of Remus) to the murder of Julius Caesar and the civil war. Throughout the course, we will ask two main questions: how did the Romans manage to transform their small town into a world power in a few centuries? That is, why did the Romans, and not any other people, manage to conquer and unify the entire Mediterranean? Secondly, we will discuss the political, social and cultural consequences of this transformation. These questions exercised the Romans themselves, and some of the responses they gave will be considered in light of current scholarship. Within a broad chronological framework, we will also discuss aspects of daily life in ancient Rome: what was life like for normal people, including women and slaves, in the Roman Republic? And how was the majority of the people affected by historical change?
 

Politics and Conscience | CNST 30602 – 15886 | POLS 30653-01 – 15716
Keys, Mary | MW 2pm-3:15pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B062

Against a backdrop of large-scale society, mass movements, and technological bureaucracy, the invocation of “conscience” recalls the individual human person as a meaningful actor in the political sphere. But what is conscience, and what are its rights and responsibilities? What is it about conscience that ought to command governmental respect? Are there limits to its autonomy? What role should conscience play in questions of war and peace, law-abidingness and civil disobedience, citizenship and political leadership? And how does the notion of conscience relate to concepts of natural law and natural rights, rationality and prudence, religion and toleration? This course engages such questions through readings from the Catholic intellectual tradition (Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas More, Fransisco de Vitoria, Desiderius Erasmus, John Henry Newman, Karol Wojty’a/John Paul II, and Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI) and other writers of the history of ethical-political thought (Cicero, Seneca, John Locke, Mahatma Ghandi, Jan Pato’ka, and Alexandr Solzhenitsyn). We consider also various contemporary reflections on conscience expressed in films, essays, letters, plays, short stories, speeches, and declarations, beginning with Martin Luther King, Jr.‘s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” and Václav Havel’s speech “Politics and Conscience.” This class serves as both the capstone course for the interdisciplinary minor Philosophy in the Catholic Tradition and an upper-level elective for Political Science majors and Peace Studies minors. Its format combines lecture and seminar-style discussion.

 

Tudor England: Politics & Honor | CNST 30604 – 19808 | HIST 30410-01 – 19807
Rapple, Rory | TTh 9:30am-10:45am | Corbett Family Hall E202

The period from 1485 to 1603, often feted as something of a ‘Golden Age’ for England, saw that country undergo serious changes that challenged the traditional ways in which the nation conceived of itself. These included the break from Rome, the loss of England’s foothold in France, and the unprecedented experience of monarchical rule by women. Each of these challenges demanded creative political responses and apologetic strategies harnessing intellectual resources from classical, Biblical, legal, chivalric and ecclesiastical sources. This course will examine these developments. It will also look at how the English, emerging from under the shadow of the internecine dynastic warfare of the fifteenth century, sought to preserve political stability and ensure a balance between continuity and change, and, furthermore, how individuals could use these unique circumstances to their own advantage.

 

US Gilded Age/Progressive Era | CNST 30629 – 17377 | HIST 30606-01 – 16574
McKenna, Rebecca | MW 11am-12:15pm | Hammes Mowbray Hall 319

This course offers an introduction to the history of the United States from Reconstruction through the First World War with particular emphasis on the social, cultural, and intellectual formations of the period. The United States made a dramatic transition in these years: from a predominantly agrarian and rural society to an urban, industrial society and imperial, world power. It is also said that in this period, a new, national, and distinctly modern culture emerged. We will test the merits of this claim and attempt to understand how Americans grappled with these broad transformations by examining the history of social formations, including class, race, and gender, together with the history of cultural formations – American popular culture, the adaptations of bourgeois culture, and the creation of mass culture. In reading sources such as short stories, poetry, political speeches, and novels, and analyzing photography, film, advertising, and architecture, we will explore the making of a modern America.
 

Ancient Politics and Law | CNST 30636 – 20355 | POLS 30722-01 – 19770
Gondelman, Jonathan | MW 12:30pm-1:45pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B071 

The rule of law is always under stress and always faces political pressure and ethical dilemmas. The premise of this course is that we can benefit from learning how ancient Greek democracies used theater as a way get perspective on those pressures in self-critical ways. Greek tragedy served as a method by which the Greeks “re-barbarized” themselves in order to consider why they had legal institutions to begin with. This class will focus on the role that the concept of law plays in ancient Greek theater and historiography. Readings include plays such as Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Antigone, and Euripides’ Hippolytus and Bacchae, as well as the histories of Herodotus (who describes the difference between Persian and Spartan attitudes to law, freedom, and slavery) and Thucydides (who depicted the total breakdown of law during civil strife. The course will also feature films that do for contemporary America what tragedy did for the Greeks. The genres of the Western movie, such as The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and film noir pose many of the same questions that the ancient tragedies investigated and, in so doing, help us think about why we have the institutions we have.

 

Political Lessons of Rome | CNST 30637 – 20356 | POLS 30723-01 – 19771
Mitchell, Colleen | TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B044

Rome grew from a small city along the Tiber into one of the world’s largest and most powerful empires. Its collapse shook the ancient world, but to this day Rome’s legacy – its language, history, art, literature, architecture, and politics – endures. In this course, we will seek to understand why the Eternal City has played such an important role in the history of political thought and why Rome is still important for contemporary times. We will begin by reading ancient Roman sources themselves and learning about Roman history, religion, and values. In so doing, we will analyze Roman political innovations as the city changed from a monarchy, to a republic, to an empire. Afterward, we will explore how Rome has been understood in the Western tradition by reading treatments of Rome by thinkers like Augustine, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Rousseau, Montesquieu, the Founding Fathers, and Mussolini. We will conclude the course by examining contemporary depictions of Rome in film and television in order to determine what Rome means for us today.

 

Intro to Phil: Ethics & Politics | PHIL10105 – 01 – 14506
Sterba, James | M W F – 2:00P – 2:50P | Crowley Hall 108


Intro to Phil: Ethics & Politics | PHIL10105 – 02 – 20533
Jech, Alexander | T R – 9:30A – 10:45A | Crowley Hall 107             


Intro to Phil: Ethics & Politics | PHIL10105 – 03 – 20536
Jech, Alexander | T R – 11:00A – 12:15P | Crowley Hall 107                       


Intro to Phil: Ethics & Politics | PHIL10105 – 04 – 20400
von Eschenbach, Warren |  R – 3:30P – 4:45P | Crowley Hall 107

This course will be an introduction to philosophy with a special focus on issues in moral and political philosophy. Topics to be discussed may include justice, the nature of the good, eudaemonic and hedonic conceptions of happiness, virtue, ethical theory, moral relativism, feminist ethics, liberty, equality, and the foundations of rights, as well as particular applied topics in moral and political philosophy (such as economic justice and the ethics of war).

           

Environmental Ethics & Politics | PHIL20609 – 01 – 19985
Hosle, Vittorio | T R – 3:30P – 4:45P | O’Shaughnessy Hall 116

Despite some progress both in the harnessing of energy and in the legal framework of various countries as well as of the international community as a whole, the destruction of the environment by industrialized humanity continues at an accelerated pace. Why is this so? And why is this morally wrong? Aim of the course is to study several books of environmental philosophy and address questions such as: Is there an intrinsic value in non-human entities? What are the principles of intergenerational justice? How can and should the state regulate our impact on the environment? Which legal and economic institutions are conducive to environmental destruction? Which changes in human history unleashed the environmental destruction? And what changes in our mentality are required to avoid an ecological catastrophe?We will read works by Partha Dasgupta, John Arthur Passmore, Holmes Rolston, Arne Naess, J.B. Callicott, Robin Attfield, Ken Sayre and Vittorio Hosle.   

 

USEM: Democracy and Religion | POLS 13181-02 – 12622
Gould, Andrew | TR 12:30-1:45pm

This seminar explores the connections between Catholicism, Islam, and democracy. What

have been the effects of each religion on democracy? How have democratic regimes affected

religions? What is toleration and what role has it played? We read Robert A. Dahl on

democracy; Max Weber on religion; Alfred Stepan on toleration; and contemporary research

for empirical evidence of the causal pathways linking Catholicism and Islam to varieties of