Courses

Spring 2019 Course List

Gateway Course: to be offered Fall 2019
 

Elective Course offerings for Spring 2019:

Electives are divided by topic for organizational purposes only.  Students may take electives from any category. Click heading for course descriptions.

American Founding & American Constitutional History

CNST COURSE# CNST CRN PRIMARY COURSE # PRIMARY CRN COURSE TITLE TEACHER SCHEDULE
CNST 20002 24407 POLS 20100-01 21419 American Politics Radcliff, Benjamin (BRADCLI1) MW 2pm-3:15pm
CNST 30019 31341 POLS 30004-01 29846 The Presidency Glaser, Sam (SGLASER) TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm
CNST 30020 31353 HIST 30863-01 30818 The U.S. in the Reagan Years Soares, John (JSOARES) TTh 2pm-3:15pm
CNST 30414 27647 AMST 30108-01 27894 History of American Capitalism Garibaldi, Korey (KGARIBAL) TTh 11am-12:15pm
CNST 43001 31409 ENGL 43620-01 30209 Citizenship and the American Novel Gustafson, Sandra (SGUSTAFS) MW 3:30pm-4:45pm
x x HIST 10400-01 27421 Western Civilization since 1500 Martin, Alexander MW 2pm-2:50pm
x x HIST 10760-01 28006 FDR to Obama Miscamble, Wilson MW 9:25am-10:15am
x x POLS 13181-03 23081 USEM: Democracy and Religion Gould, Andrew TR 11:00am-12:15pm
x x POLS 53002-03 22284 Sr. Sem: American Citizenship in the 21st Century Cortez, David TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Comparative Constitutionalism & International Law

CNST COURSE# CNST CRN PRIMARY COURSE # PRIMARY CRN COURSE TITLE TEACHER SCHEDULE
CNST 20200 24176 POLS 20400-01 21387 World Politics: Intro to Comp. Gould, Andrew (AGOULD) TTh 9:30am-10:45am
CNST 30200 29856 POLS 30220-01 29855 International Law Powell, Emilia Justyna (EPOWELL4) TTh 11am-12:15pm
CNST 30214 31350 CLAS 30211-01 30384 Roman Criminal Law Mazurek, Tadeusz (TMAZUREK) MWF 10:30am-11:20am
CNST 30233 28109 POLS 30441-01 28117 Middle-East Politics Hoffman, Michael (MHOFFMA5) TTh 2pm-3:15pm
CNST 30242 28229 HIST 30456-01 27435 Bodies in European History Jarvis, Katie (KJARVIS) MW 9:25am-10:15am
CNST 30243 31343 POLS 30312-01 29859 Int'l Humanitarian Law Kwon, Minju (MKWON) MW 2pm-3:15pm
CNST 30411 31352 HIST 30805-01 27442 US Foreign Policy in Cold War Miscamble, Wilson (WMISCAMB) MW 2pm-3:15pm
CNST 30630 31351 HIST 30450-01 30805 Old Regime France Jarvis, Katie (KJARVIS) MW 12:30pm-1:45pm
CNST 33200 31347 RU 33500-01 30563 Behind the Iron Curtain Wang, Emily (EWANG3) MW 2pm-3:15pm
x x HIST 30524-01 30809 Modern European Thought Shortall, Sarah (SSHORTAL) T R 3:30pm-4:45pm 
x x POLS 30401-01 27096 Latin American Politics Scully, Timothy T 7:00pm-9:45pm
x x POLS 43002-06 29881 Jr. Sem: Varieties of Democracy Coppedge, Michael TR 2:00pm-3:15pm
x x POLS 53002-05 25470 Sr. Sem: Authoritarian Politics Koesel, Karrie MW 9:30am-10:45am
x x POLS 53002-06 27104 Sr. Sem: Islamic Constitutionalism and Legal Tradition Powell, Emilia TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

Constitutional Government & Public Policy

CNST COURSE# CNST CRN PRIMARY COURSE # PRIMARY CRN COURSE TITLE TEACHER SCHEDULE
CNST 20403 26358 SOC 20732-01 22151 Introduction to Criminology Thomas, Mim (MTHOMA13) MWF 9:25am-10:15am
CNST 20405 31407 HESB 20010-01 27078 Intro to Public Policy Francis, Claudia (CANEWALT) MW 9:30am-10:45am
CNST 30421 31342 POLS 30164-01 29853 Modern Constitutional Theory Moore, Tyler (TMOORE7) TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm
CNST 30422 31408 HESB 30330-01 30221 Reinventing Government Mueller, Paul (PMUELLE1) TTh 9:30am-10:45am
x x ECON 33150-01 28207 Intro to Econ & Catholic Thought Kaboski, Joseph MW 2pm-3:15pm
x x HESB 43897-01 30226 The Policy-Making Process Ramirez, Ricardo MW 2:00pm-3:15pm
x x PHIL 20401-01 28207 Ethics Rodriguez, Jennifer MW 11:00am-12:15pm
x x PHIL 20401-04 31624 Ethics Uffenheimer, Chloe TR 3:30pm-4:45pm
x x POLS 13181-04 24536 USEM: Greatest War Story Ever Told Desch, Michael TR 12:30pm-1:45pm
x x POLS 53002-04 22814 Sr. Sem: Constitutional Interpretation Barber, Sotirios TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

Constitutional History and Philosophy

CNST COURSE# CNST CRN PRIMARY COURSE # PRIMARY CRN COURSE TITLE TEACHER SCHEDULE
CNST 20602 24177 POLS 20600-01 21389 Political Theory Kaplan, Joshua (JKAPLAN) MWF 11:30am-12:20pm
CNST 20612 31346 CLAS 20010-01 30375 History of Liberal Education Bloomer, W. Martin (MBLOOMER) MW 12:50pm-1:40pm
CNST 30600 30382 CLAS 30112-01 30381 The Age of Alexander Baron, Christopher (CBARON1) TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm
CNST 30615 27649 POLS 30664-01 27098 Liberalism and Conservatism Deneen, Patrick (PDENEEN1) MW 3:30pm-4:45pm
CNST 30633 31344 POLS 30618-01 29863 Am Conservatism & Constitutionalism II Barber, Sotirios (SBARBER) TTh 11am-12:15pm
CNST 30634 31345 POLS 30717-01 29866 Political Phiosophyl of Communism/Fascism Hartman, Matthew (MHARTMA5) MW 3:30pm-4:45pm
CNST 30635 31354 HIST 30554-01 30811 Catholicism Confronts Modernity Shortall, Sarah (SSHORTAL) TTh 11am-12:15pm
CNST 40605 25511 THEO 40613-01 24543 Catholic Social Teaching Pfeil, Margaret (MPFEIL1) MW 11am-12:15pm
x x PHIL 10105-01 26431 Intro to Phil: Ethics & Polit. von Eschenbach, Warren TR 3:30pm-4:45pm
x x PHIL 10105-03 27621 Intro to Phil: Ethics & Polit. Sterba, James MWF 11:00am-11:50am
x x PHIL 10105-04 27622 Intro to Phil: Ethics & Polit. Sterba, James MWF 12:50pm-1:40pm
x x PHIL 20425-01 31204 Contemporary Political Phil Weithman, Paul TR 3:30pm-4:45pm
x x PHIL 43404-01 30890 Philosophy of Law Warfield, Ted MW 11:00am-12:15pm
x x PLS 30302-01 23065 Political & Const. Theory Planinc, Emma MW 9:30am-10:45pm
x x PLS 30302-02 22506 Political & Const. Theory Planinc, Emma MW 11:00am-12:15pm

Updated 11.13.18

 

Course Descriptions

American Founding & American Constitutional History

 

POLS 20100-01 | CNST 20002 | American Politics
Radcliff, Benjamin (BRADCLI1)| MW 2pm-3:15pm

This course surveys the basic institutions and practices of American politics. The goal of the course is to gain a more systematic understanding of American politics that will help you become better informed and more articulate. The course examines the institutional and constitutional framework of American politics and identifies the key ideas needed to understand politics today. The reading and writing assignments have been designed not only to inform you, but also to help develop your analytic and research skills. The themes of the course include the logic and consequences of the separation of powers, the build-in biases of institutions and procedures, the origins and consequence of political reforms, and recent changes in American politics in the 21st century. This semester we will emphasize the significance of the upcoming 2016 elections, and the course will include election-related assignments. Although the course counts toward the Political Science major and will prepare prospective majors for further study of American politics, its primary aim is to introduce students of all backgrounds and interests to the information, ideas, and academic skills that will enable them to understand American politics better and help them become more thoughtful and responsible citizens.

POLS 30004-01 | CNST 30019 | The Presidency
Glaser, Sam (SGLASER)| TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm

As the Trump Presidency enters its third year, the White House faces a new Congress and the need to consider the next presidential election. Meanwhile, analysts, scholars, and the public struggle to determine whether this presidency, and the circumstances that surround it, are an anomaly or "the new normal." This course will examine the presidency as one political institution among many, one which negotiates with, fights with, bypasses, and maneuvers around others, including the electorate, the bureaucracy, Congress, the courts, and the parties. We will consider the historical development of the presidency and the choices of past presidents, and we will work to understand how modern phenomena, such as high partisan polarization and the fracturing of Congress, affect the President's choices and the consequences of those choices.

HIST 30863-01 | CNST 30020 | The U.S. in the Reagan Years
Soares, John (JSOARES)| TTh 2pm-3:15pm

From his national television appearance in support of the doomed Goldwater presidential campaign in 1964 through his failed presidential runs in 1968 and 1976 and his presidency (1981-89) on to the official dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Ronald Reagan played a significant role in, and in reaction to, major developments in American politics, foreign policy, and society. This class will consider the turbulence and protest movements of the 1960s; the conservative backlash; the individualism of the Me Decade and beyond; foreign policy issues including Vietnam, dÄtente, the second Cold War, and the end of the Cold War; and national political disputes over issues like taxes, abortion, foreign policy and nuclear weapons.

AMST 30108-01 | CNST 30414 | History of American Capitalism
Garibaldi, Korey (KGARIBAL)| TTh 11am-12:15pm

This course offers a broad thematic overview of the history of capitalism from the early sixteenth century up to the late 1980s. As a discussion-based seminar, we will devote most of our conversations to discovering, analyzing and reflecting on the transformation of the U.S. from a newly-independent British colony, to the most influential economic power in the world. Topics and themes we will consider include: the rise of early modern transnational capitalism, European imperialism and trade, and indigenous dispossession after 1492; science and technological transformations; social and economic thought; slavery and servitude, broadly construed; and characteristics of prosperity, wealth, and economic flux. Our readings and viewings will be a mix of scholarly and primary sources, including an abundance of canonical literary and artistic material, such as novels, visual art, and film excerpts (e.g. Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House (1879), Aaron Douglas's Building More Stately Mansions (1944), and Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence (1920)). Over the course of the semester, students will draw upon this eclectic combination of sources to synthesize the dominant historical dimensions of capitalism in and beyond the U.S. via four short essays (4 - 5 pages, double-spaced└between 1,100 and 1,400 words), and a final paper (10 └ 12 pages, double-spaced) based on cumulative texts.

ENGL 43620-01 | CNST 43001 | Citizenship & American Novel
Gustafson, Sandra (SGUSTAFS)| MW 3:30pm-4:45pm

This course will explore how civic life is represented in American fiction. We will take up questions of form and style as they relate to distinctive visions of the common good in such novels as Nathaniel Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables, Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Henry Adams's Democracy: An American Romance, Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, Katherine Anne Porter's Pale Horse, Pale Rider, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, and Chang-Rae Lee's Native Speaker.

HIST 10400-01 | x | Western Civ since 1500
Martin, Alexander| MW 2pm-2:50pm

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of European history over the last four centuries. During this period European states emerged as powerful institutions, extending their control over the peoples of Europe, and battling with each other for territory, subjects, and status, both in Europe and throughout the world. The enormous growth of state power provoked opposition from both elites and ordinary people. This course will explore resistance to the state as well as tracing its growth, with special attention paid to the English revolution in the 17th century, the French and Russian revolutions in 1789 and 1917, and the collapse of the Soviet empire in the late 20th century. Particular attention will be paid to the development of the ideologies of liberalism, socialism, and nationalism, which defined new relationships between people and their states in the 19th and 20th centuries. The changing status of women, and the emergence of feminism as another ideological alternative, will be dealt with as well. The conflicted relationship between Europe and its colonial territories will constitute another major theme.

HIST 10760-01 | x | FDR to Obama
Miscamble, Wilson| MW 9:25am-10:15am

This lecture and discussion course will examine the presidencies and presidential administrations from Franklin Roosevelt to Barack Obama. The course will aim to provide an overview of the principle strengths and limitations of these administrations in both foreign affairs and domestic policy. The course should appeal to those who have particular interests in American political and diplomatic history.

POLS 13181-03 | x | USEM: Democracy and Religion
Gould, Andrew| TR 11:00am-12:15pm

This seminar explores the connections between Catholicism, Islam, and democracy. What have been the effects of each religion on democracy? How have democratic regimes affected religions? What is toleration and what role has it played? We read Robert A. Dahl on democracy; Max Weber on religion; Alfred Stepan on toleration; and contemporary research for empirical evidence of the causal pathways linking Catholicism and Islam to varieties of political regimes.

POLS 53002-03 | x | Sr. Sem: American Citizenship in the 21st Century
Cortez, David| TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Who belongs in the United States, and how do we decide? Motivated by these central questions, this course explores what it has meant, and what it means today, to be an American by tracing the mutually-constitutive relationship between formal membership in the polity and specific notions about race, class, and gender. Beginning with an introduction to the theoretical conception of citizenship, the course proceeds as a sociopolitical analysis of the ╥roots╙ and ╥routes╙ to American citizenship ╤ from the Naturalization Act of 1790 to the proposed Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act. Interdisciplinary by design, this course draws on empirical studies, popular culture, and current events to engage students in an informed discussion of a sensitive, but ever-salient subject in American political life. Topics covered include: the precondition of ╥Whiteness╙; the historical role of ╥the stranger╙; immigrant incorporation, exclusion, and expulsion; and the mutability of Jus Meritum (service-citizenship).

 


Comparative Constitutionalism & International Law

 

POLS 20400-01 | CNST 20200 | World Politics: Intro to Comp
Gould, Andrew (AGOULD)| TTh 9:30am-10:45am

This course will focus on the relationship between democratic institutions, peace, and economic/human development. While drawing on lessons from North America and Europe, we will focus largely on countries of Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. During the semester, we will discuss and debate the merits of various explanations or hypotheses that political scientists have proposed to answer the following questions: Why are some countries more "developed" and democratic than others? Is development necessary for democracy or democracy necessary for development? What is the relationship between culture, development, and democracy? How do different types of political institutions affect the prospects for development and democracy? Should/how should U.S. and other established democracies promote democratization? By the end of the course, the objectives are that students (1) learn the most important theories intended to explain why some countries are more democratic and "developed" than others, (2) understand the complexity of any relationship between democracy and development, and (3) grow in the ability to think about and intelligently assess the strengths and weaknesses of strategies intended to promote democracy and development.

POLS 30220-01 | CNST 30200 | International Law
Powell, Emilia Justyna (EPOWELL4)| TTh 11am-12:15pm

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to international law. In the beginning of the semester, we will focus on general characteristics of international law, such as its historical development, main thinkers, subjects, and sources of law. Second, we will study several substantive areas of international law, such as human rights, international criminal law, diplomacy, and peaceful resolution of disputes. Next, we will examine international courts, such as the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice. We will conclude the course by analyzing international law through the lenses of domestic legal systems. Upon completion of this course, students should be familiar with the main features of international law and its historical development.

CLAS 30211-01 | CNST 30214 | Roman Criminal Law
Mazurek, Tadeusz (TMAZUREK)| MWF 10:30am-11:20am

Perhaps our greatest inheritance from the ancient Romans is their law code and legal procedures. Students will study the development of Roman criminal law from the 12 Tables to the late antique period, including the emergence of jury courts and the persecution of Christians and heretics. By studying primary sources like Cicero's speeches and laws etched in bronze tablets, students will explore the seedy side of Roman life. Topics for discussion include murder, sorcery, bribery, forgery, treason, extortion and adultery. This course will not duplicate, but complement, Roman Law and Governance (CLAS 30210)

POLS 30441-01 | CNST 30233 | Middle-East Politics
Hoffman, Michael (MHOFFMA5)| TTh 2pm-3:15pm

The Middle East is simultaneously one of the most strategically important regions in the world and one of the least understood. This course provides an introduction to the politics of the region from a thematic perspective. It addresses a variety of topics, including democracy, development, sectarianism, oil, and conflict. Students will be assigned readings from both historical scholarship and contemporary analysis of regional issues. When applicable, cases from across the region will be used to illustrate the themes of the course.

HIST 30456-01 | CNST 30242 | Bodies in European History
Jarvis, Katie (KJARVIS)| MW 9:25am-10:15am

Between the early rumblings of the Reformations and the last cannon shot of World War I, Europeans profoundly changed how they conceptualized bodies as experience and metaphors. During these four centuries, Europeans grounded the ways in which they interacted with each other and the world in bodily imaginings. On an individual level, the living, human body provided a means of accessing and understanding the material or spiritual world. On a collective scale, the physical body, its adornments, and its gestures provided markers that Europeans used to fracture society along axes of gender, sexuality, class, race, mental aptitude, and even sacrality. Drawing in part from their myriad imaginings of the human body, Europeans constructed metaphorical political bodies. The body politic assumed diverse forms spanning from divine right monarchs to revolutionary republics to modern nation states. Our course will lay bare the human body as culturally constructed, while fleshing out how Europeans' evolving visions affected political imaginings.

POLS 30312-01 | CNST 30243 | Int'l Humanitarian Law
Kwon, Minju (MKWON)| MW 2pm-3:15pm

This course offers a comprehensive understanding of the key concepts and debates regarding international humanitarian law. Students will learn about theoretical approaches for analyzing topics relevant to international humanitarian law, particularly from the perspectives of political science. Students will discuss controversial topics surrounding the application of international humanitarian law, including the issues of humanitarian interventions and non-state armed groups. We will also discuss current issues, including civilian targeting, child soldiers, and gender violence. As part of our study, we will explore several cases across regions and countries, such as Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

HIST 30805-01 | CNST 30411 | US Foreign Policy in Cold War
Miscamble, Wilson (WMISCAMB)| MW 2pm-3:15pm

This course covers the main developments in American foreign policy from World War II through the end of the Cold War. The principal topics of investigation will be wartime diplomacy and the origins of the Cold War; the Cold War and containment in Europe and Asia; Eisenhower/Dulles diplomacy; Kennedy-Johnson and Vietnam; Nixon-Kissinger and dÄtente; Carter and the diplomacy of Human Rights; Reagan and the revival of containment; Bush and the end of the Cold War.

HIST 30450-01 | CNST 30630 | Old Regime France
Jarvis, Katie (KJARVIS)| MW 12:30pm-1:45pm

Between 1643 and 1789, France underwent one of the most pivotal national transitions in modern European history. In the second half of the seventeenth century, Louis XIV reigned as the most powerful divine right monarch on the continent. He marshaled religious ideology, set cultural standards, pursued economic projects, and waged wars to consolidate his authority over the French and foreign powers alike. Yet, by the late eighteenth century, Louis XVI's crumbling crown gave way to the Revolution. The French ultimately dethroned the king and established a republic. Our class will explore how the French negotiated this tumultuous trajectory from subjects to citizens. We will analyze three main themes over the course of the Old Regime. First, we will wrestle with issues of modern state building including administrative reform, military campaigns, financial ventures, and expansion in the New World. Second, we will study the relationship among politics, culture, and religion as the French vacillated between critique and reform. Finally, we will probe the origins of the French Revolution. These sparks ranged from Enlightenment debates over contract theory and social privilege to the stresses of everyday life including taxes and food shortages. We will close as the revolutionaries imagined nascent citizenship on the eve of the republic. In sum, this course will ask: how did European democracy find its roots in an absolute monarchy? And how did generations of French work out this transition through their everyday lives?

HIST 30554-01 | CNST 30635 | Catholicism Confronts Modernity
Shortall, Sarah (SSHORTAL)| TTh 11am-12:15pm

This class introduces students to the history of Catholicism since the French Revolution, focusing primarily on Europe. It examines how Catholics confronted the challenges of modernity - from liberal democracy and nationalism; to capitalism and modern science; to new political ideologies such as fascism and communism. We will explore not only how these encounters transformed the Church, but also how Catholicism itself has shaped modern politics and culture. The first part of the course begins with the nineteenth-century - culture wars - between Catholics and anticlerical forces, focusing in particular on popular devotions like the Lourdes pilgrimage and the perceived "feminization" of religion. The second part of the course shifts to the twentieth century and examines the relationship between the Catholic Church and modern political ideologies such as nationalism, fascism, communism, and democracy. The third part of the course explores modern Catholic art, literature, and film. Finally, we close by examining the more recent history of Catholicism since the transformative changes of the Second Vatican Council in the 1960s. Readings are drawn from a range of primary sources - including novels, speeches, Church documents, works of art, and films - as well as secondary sources by historians.

RU 33500-01 | CNST 33200 | Behind the Iron Curtain
Wang, Emily (EWANG3)| MW 2pm-3:15pm

Was the Soviet Union a "workers' paradise" or an "evil empire?" Nearly three decades after this country transformed into what we now call "post-Soviet space," the legacy of the USSR looms large in international politics and culture. This course will offer students an introduction to Soviet history through film, which Lenin famously called "the most important of the arts," and literature, which Soviet writers used to "engineer human souls." Since the 1917 Revolution, art has had a close relationship to the Soviet state. At the same time, writers and filmmakers with individualistic and even rebellious tendencies have created some of the twentieth century's greatest masterpieces, including Dziga Vertov's Man With a Movie Camera and Mikhail Bulgakov's Master and Margarita. In this class we will explore how this tense relationship between art and the state developed in the first half of the twentieth century. Since cultural context is an important lens for our analysis, each artistic work will be accompanied by historical readings about the period in which it was produced, as well as artistic manifestos and contemporary reviews, when relevant. All films will be shown with subtitles and all readings offered in English. Students of the Russian language have the option of discussing the course material in Russian once a week with the instructor in a group for an additional course credit.

 

HIST 30524-01  |  x  |  Modern European Thought
Shrotall, Sarah  |   TR 3:30pm-4:45pm

Since the eighteenth century, Europeans have grappled with a number of transformative events and developments, from the French Revolution and the birth of an industrial economy, to catastrophic wars and the rise and fall of European empires. In the process of making sense of these events, they produced works of philosophy, political theory, art, and literature that continue to shape the way we understand our place in the world today. This course introduces students to the history of European thought from the Enlightenment to the present, a period that birthed the many great "isms" that have defined the modern world: liberalism, socialism, nationalism, feminism, existentialism, totalitarianism, and colonialism. Course readings will be drawn from a range of primary sources, including novels, works of philosophy, political treatises, films, and works of art, as well as secondary sources by historians. By reading these two kinds of sources together, we will explore not only how ideas and works of art were shaped by the historical context in which they were produced, but also how they themselves shaped the course of European history.

 

POLS 30401-01  |  x  |  Latin American Politics
Scully, Timothy  |  T 7:00pm-9:45pm

Politics of Latin America is intended to be a multi-disciplinary introduction to critical issues within contemporary Latin American culture, society, politics, and economy. An assumption behind the organization of this course is that many of the traditional boundaries between different disciplines in the social sciences and the humanities are drawn somewhat arbitrarily, and that a more comprehensive understanding of Latin America can, and even should, be approached from a number of different analytic and disciplinary lenses. Thus, we will trespass traditional disciplinary boundaries from time to time over the course of the semester. The course is divided into two major parts. The first part is organized around a number of key analytic lenses, which we will employ sequentially with an aim to gaining a deeper appreciation of important aspects of contemporary Latin America. We will begin with a discussion of the utility of "culture" as a tool for understanding Latin America. Is there such a thing as "Latin America" understood as a discrete category of countries, and if so, what do they share in common? We will follow this discussion with an exploration of what is certainly a chief cultural expression among any people, an exploration of levels of religiosity and their relationship to social and political behavior. Other key features of culture will be woven into the analyses of the case studies we will undertake for the remainder of the course. We will explore the wide variation in the quality of democratic governance in different Latin American countries. And we will we look to some of the sources of that variation, including democratic institution building, economic and social policy making, and the persistence of populist politics, and forces in the international arena, such as U.S Foreign Policy, among other factors. In the remainder of the course, we will look specifically at country-cases in comparative perspective, in particular Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Colombia and Venezuela. In selecting these cases, I have made a conscious decision to sacrifice breadth for greater depth. An effort will be made throughout the discussion of the cases to make broader comparisons with a wider range of Latin American cases.
 

 

POLS 43002-06 | x | Jr. Sem: Varieties of Democracy
Coppedge, Michael| TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

This course is a guided exploration of the many ideals associated with democracy and the extent to which they have been realized in practice around the world. It begins with a survey of the varied ways that philosophers and cultures have thought about democracy. It then explains how social scientists have translated these ideals into various measures of democracy that we can use to compare the performance of regimes. The course provides inside access to the Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem) dataset, which was created by more than three thousand country experts all over the world and is quickly becoming the preferred source of democracy data for international organizations, development agencies, and researchers. The course provides you with the methodological tools you need to explore the data in depth to answer questions such as: What does it mean to be ╥democratic╙? Are there different types of democracy in the world? What are the different ways of being undemocratic? Which countries and regions are most and least democratic in each way? What trends can we observe over the past century? Are there sequences of reforms that lead to successful democratization? You will also supplement the data with independent research to produce a detailed report evaluating or explaining the strengths and weaknesses of political regimes in one country and placing it in comparative and historical perspective. The course is divided up into four parts: democratic theory, measures of democracy, historical trends, and explanations. All of this is designed to prepare you to write an insightful report on democratization using V-Dem data and other evidence. In most cases, these reports will describe and interpret one country╒s political history. However, I am open to other kinds of reports, such as comparisons of several countries or analyses more focused on explanation. This class does not include training in statistics, so none of the assignments requires statistical analysis. However, students who have such training are welcome to use it, and I will help them obtain the V-Dem dataset and get started with it.

POLS 53002-05 | x | Sr. Sem: Authoritarian Politics
Koesel, Karrie| MW 9:30am-10:45am

This seminar explores the nature and types of authoritarian regimes, as well as the strategies despots and dictators use to maintain themselves in power. We will examine how these strategies create incentives for those in power to act for or against the common good, and thus evaluate some important arguments for and against various forms of non-democracy. In particular, we will focus on whether dictatorships produce more prosperity than democracies, whether some cultures are prone to dictatorship, and whether some authoritarian regimes make more intelligent policy decisions than democracies.

POLS 53002-06 | x | Sr. Sem: Islamic Constitutionalism and Legal Tradition
Powell, Emilia| TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

This seminar offers an introduction to Islamic law and Islamic constitutionalism. How are law, justice and constitutionalism perceived and interpreted in Muslim societies? Do constitutions and the sub constitutional legal system of Muslim societies differ from those of the West? Nearly a quarter of the earth╒s total population is Muslim, and the Islamic legal tradition continues to offer a prominent alternative organizing principle in Muslim societies, affecting numerous states╒ approach to constitutionalism. In order to understand the mechanisms and philosophy of Islamic constitutionalism, students will consider the meaning of Islamic justice, its embodiment in domestic legal systems in states of the Middle East, Africa, and Asia/Oceania. We will examine the role of Islamic jurisprudence in the shaping the Islamic legal tradition, and how a faith-based concept of law relates to modern governance. We will also study the nexus between religious law and secular law in the context of modern day Islamic law states. The class will entail reading constitutions, legislation, and codes of Islamic law states, with particular emphasis on states of the Arab Middle East. Textual analysis of constitutions will be embedded in philosophy, jurisprudence, and history of the Islamic legal tradition.

 

 

Constitutional Government & Public Policy

 

SOC 20732-01 | CNST 20403 | Introduction to Criminology
Thomas, Mim (MTHOMA13)| MWF 9:25am-10:15am

Introduction to Criminology provides students with an overview of the sociological study of law making, law breaking and the resulting social responses. In this class we not only look at a variety of crimes, but we also discuss the varying methods sociologists use to collect, interpret and evaluate data, as well as how we theorize about crime and punishment. We address questions such as "Why are some people or groups labeled as criminal, while others are not?" "Do laws in both their construction and enforcement serve everyone's interests equally?" "How can the communities in which people are embedded be considered as criminogenic?" "How are poverty, race, gender and other social factors related to crime?"

HESB 20010-01 | CNST 20405 | Intro to Public Policy
Francis, Claudia (CANEWALT)| MW 9:30am-10:45am

This course introduces students to fundamentals of public policy by examining the policy process as well as reviewing tools for policy assessment and analysis. In our exploration of the policymaking process, we will examine how government structure shapes that process, as well as the role and influence of various actors, including parties and special interests. Throughout the semester we will delve into substantive policy areas healthcare, immigration, economic and social policy. Students will have a group project to research a specific policy that is currently receiving significant national attention. This project will provide students an opportunity to learn and practice policy writing. The format of the course will be a mix of lecture, small group discussion and in-class activities. Grades will be based on exams, a group project, and participation.

POLS 30164-01 | CNST 30421 | Modern Constitutional Theory
Moore, Tyler (TMOORE7)| TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm

This seminar will examine a number of theoretical issues that play a central role in modern U.S. Supreme Court case law, including the nature and purpose of constitutions, the desirability of judicial review, theories of constitutional interpretation such as ╘originalism╒ and ╘living constitutionalism╒, the extent to which judges permissibly perform tasks other than interpretation, the use of history in constitutional reasoning, theories of precedent, the relationship between state and federal power, and the tension between collective interests and individual rights. Given the diversity of topics covered, the assigned readings too will come from scholars of varied backgrounds and perspectives, including Ronald Dworkin, Justice Antonin Scalia, Jeremy Waldron, Richard Fallon, Larry Solum, and Judge Richard Posner. Students should expect to walk away from the course with a better appreciation for the higher-level disputes that shape American constitutional law and animate scholarship in political science departments, law schools, and beyond.HESB 30330-01 | CNST 30422 | Reinventing Government
Mueller, Paul (PMUELLE1)| TTh 9:30am-10:45am

Since World War II, many presidential candidates have campaigned on promises to make government more efficient, delivering services to individuals more cheaply, faster, and with fewer errors. We will explore the attempts made to re-invent the federal bureaucracy since the advent of the spoils system with Andrew Jackson's presidential victory in 1828. We will examine the regulatory challenges presented to local, state and federal governments by the Industrial Revolution and how government responded. Finally, we will examine critically, the various initiatives of the last quarter century to improve or re-invent the delivery of public goods. This class will provide the student with the tools to understand the challenges of public administration, measure the effectiveness of various improvement initiatives, diagnose potential maladies within the current system and effectively communicate those findings others.

ECON 33150-01 | CNST 33400 | Intro to Econ & Catholic Thought
Kaboski, Joseph| MW 2pm-3:15pm

This course is the seminar version of 30150. In this course we will discuss the relationship between economics and Catholic social teaching. We will learn about key principles in Catholic social thought, read key Papal encyclicals and other writings. We will then discuss key economic concepts and empirical facts known from the field of economics, and how these relate to Catholic social teaching. Finally, we will apply these ideas to discussions on labor, capital, finance, the environment, globalization, and development

PHIL 20401-01 and PHIL 20401-04  |  x  |  Ethics
Rodriguez, Jennifer - MW 11:30am-12:15pm  /  Uffenheimer, Chloe - TR 3:30pm-4:45pm

In this course we will deal with ethical questions such as: are abortion and euthanasia wrong? How should we treat animals and the environment? What duties do we have to the impoverished? And we will address meta-ethical issues such as: is there such a thing as objective right and wrong? How do we figure out what is right or wrong? Is God or some supernatural being needed to ground morality? Why should we even be moral in the first place? Students will learn to wield the arguments for and against various positions. They will also defend these positions both orally and in writing by the presentation and criticism of arguments.

HESB 43897-01 | x | The Policy-Making Process
Ramirez, Ricardo| MW 2:00pm-3:15pm

This course examines the public policy-making process at the federal, state, and local levels. Students will explore a specific policy problem affecting the South Bend metropolitan area. The goal will be to write and present a policy brief to local decision-makers in public policy.

POLS 13181-04 | x | USEM: Greatest War Story Ever
Desch, Michael| TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

The Greek historian and erstwhile general Thucydides modestly claimed to have written his history of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta in the waning years of the Fifth Century B.C. ╥not as an essay which is to win the applause of the moment, but as a possession for all time.╙ (I, 22) He succeeded with the pen (or stylus) where he failed with the sword leading generations of thinkers and practitioners to study this work with a fervor and intensity usually reserved for Holy Scripture. Indeed, Secretary of State George C. Marshall once told a Princeton graduating class that ╥I doubt seriously whether a man can think with full wisdom and deep convictions regarding certain of the basic international issues today who has not at least reviewed in his mind the period of the Peloponnesian Wars and the fall of Athens.╙ That is the purpose of this seminar.

POLS 53002-04 | x | Sr. Sem: Constitutional Interpretation
Barber, Sotirios| TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

Americans have always debated Supreme Court opinions on specific constitutional questions involving the powers of government and the rights of individuals and minorities. The leading objective of this course is to acquaint students with the basic issues of constitutional interpretation and to show how they influence questions involving constitutional rights and powers and the scope of judicial review. At least one course in constitutional law recommended. Open to Graduate Students

 

 

Constitutional History and Philosophy

 

POLS 20600-01 | CNST 20602 | Political Theory
Kaplan, Joshua (JKAPLAN)| MWF 11:30am-12:20pm

This course is an introduction to political theory as a tradition of discourse and as a way of thinking about politics. The course surveys selected works of political theory and explores some of the recurring themes and questions that political theory addresses, especially the question of justice. This introductory course fulfils the political theory breadth requirement for the political science major.

CLAS 20010-01 | CNST 20612 | History of Liberal Education
Bloomer, W. Martin (MBLOOMER)| MW 12:50pm-1:40pm

This class examines the practices of schooling from its foundational period and institutions in ancient Greece through transformations in the Roman empire and onto the variety of schooling in the middle ages, which not only "transmitted" the seven liberal arts but developed new institutions, ideas, and movements for education. We shall examine both prescriptions (what Plato or Quintilian or John Dewey said should be done) and actual practices of schooling children. We shall also study, selectively and as comparisons, periods and movements of reform, in the Middle Ages, Renaissance and the Enlightenment, with some attention to twentieth-century America. The processes of learning to read and write, curricular studies, corporal punishment and motivation more broadly, the materials and setting of schooling, and the social dynamics of the communities of educators and the educated will be topics of recurring interest.

CLAS 30112-01 | CNST 30600 | The Age of Alexander
Baron, Christopher (CBARON1)| TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm

This course examines the military achievements of Alexander of Macedon (356-323B.C.) and their far-reaching political, social, cultural, and religious consequences. Topics covered include the Greek, Macedonian, Persian, and other cultural contexts of the time, Alexander's attitude toward divinity (including his own), his concept of empire, his generalship, and his legacy for Greco-Roman antiquity. Particular attention is devoted to representations of Alexander through the ages, beginning during his own lifetime with the accounts of ancient writers, historians and others, down to novels and films of the present day. Ancient authors and documents are read in translation.

POLS 30664-01 | CNST 30615 | Liberalism and Conservatism
Deneen, Patrick (PDENEEN1)| MW 3:30pm-4:45pm

This course will explore the intellectual foundations of the constellation of ideas that have become the dominant political worldviews in modern American society. The course will focus on European sources of each tradition, as well as developments of each in America. Concepts that will be explored include progress, historicism, pragmatism, liberty, equality, diversity, cosmopolitanism, localism, tradition, prescription, authority, secularism and religion, particularly Catholicism.

POLS 30618-01 | CNST 30633 | Am Conservatism & Const. II
Barber, Sotirios (SBARBER)| TTh 11am-12:15pm

Americans "constitutional government" as "limited government." This enables conservative champions of limited government to present themselves as the Constitution's defenders and portray liberal champions of active government as constitutional infidels. In recent years, however, some scholars have argued that a true account of the Constitution belies the conservative view. Which side does the evidence favor? This course examines this question as it relates to constitutional rights. We'll discuss the logical relationship of constitutional rights to constitutional powers and the proper approach to the interpretation of constitutional rights. We'll also examine the conservative view of specific rights like private property, reproductive rights, the right to bear arms, and the freedom of religion. Course grades will be based on a mid-term exam, a final exam, and an optional term paper. Course readings will include The Declaration of Independence, The Federalist Papers, and modern works like The Heritage Guide to the Constitution, and the writings of William Schambra, Charles Kessler, Thomas West, Richard Garnett, Gerald Gauss, and Ingrid Creppell.

POLS 30717-01 | CNST 30634 | Pol Phil of Communism/Fascism
Hartman, Matthew (MHARTMA5)| MW 3:30pm-4:45pm

Things fall apart; the center cannot hold; politics as we have normally understood it in the United States is at a precipice. Centrism and consensus-building are no longer obvious forms of social organization. What is to be done? In this course, we will approach contemporary uncertainty about the proper role of government by investigating the major modern alternatives to the American regime: Communism and Fascism. Readings will include foundational texts by Marx, Engels, Luxemburg, and Lenin on the Left and Mussolini, Hitler, and Schmitt on the Right. In addition, we will read critiques of both Communism and Fascism by Arendt, Strauss, and Benjamin. Through these assignments we will develop both an understanding of the allure of extremist philosophies and a set of responses to our contemporary moment.

THEO 40613-01 | CNST 40605 | Catholic Social Teaching
Pfeil, Margaret (MPFEIL1)| MW 11am-12:15pm

This seminar will introduce students to the key texts that make up Catholic social teaching. Students will read one document each week and ask how the document's ideas relate to our own present lives and planned futures. The course concludes with asking what would our anticipated professional vocations look like if informed by Catholic social teaching. For instance, what would a law firm or health clinic look like if they were formed by ideas such as the common good and the option for the poor.

PHIL 10105-01 | x | Intro to Phil: Ethics & Polit.
von Eschenbach, Warren| TR 3:30pm-4:45pm

This course will be an introduction to philosophy with a special focus on issues in moral and political philosophy. Topics to be discussed may include justice, the nature of the good, eudaemonic and hedonic conceptions of happiness, virtue, ethical theory, moral relativism, feminist ethics, liberty, equality, and the foundations of rights, as well as particular applied topics in moral and political philosophy (such as economic justice and the ethics of war).

PHIL 10105-03 | x | Intro to Phil: Ethics & Polit.
Sterba, James| MWF 11:00am-11:50am

This course will be an introduction to philosophy with a special focus on issues in moral and political philosophy. Topics to be discussed may include justice, the nature of the good, eudaemonic and hedonic conceptions of happiness, virtue, ethical theory, moral relativism, feminist ethics, liberty, equality, and the foundations of rights, as well as particular applied topics in moral and political philosophy (such as economic justice and the ethics of war).

PHIL 10105-04 | x | Intro to Phil: Ethics & Polit.
Sterba, James| MWF 12:50pm-1:40pm

This course will be an introduction to philosophy with a special focus on issues in moral and political philosophy. Topics to be discussed may include justice, the nature of the good, eudaemonic and hedonic conceptions of happiness, virtue, ethical theory, moral relativism, feminist ethics, liberty, equality, and the foundations of rights, as well as particular applied topics in moral and political philosophy (such as economic justice and the ethics of war).

PHIL 20425-01 | x | Contemporary Political Phil
Weithman, Paul| TR 3:30pm-4:45pm

This course will survey the books and papers which have set the agenda for political philosophy in recent decades. Topics covered will include, but not be limited to, the foundation of rights, economic justice and international justice. The course is intended for first year Honors Students, and will allow them to satisfy the second philosophy requirement.

PHIL 43404-01 | x | Philosophy of Law
Warfield, Ted| MW 11:00am-12:15pm

An overview of central topics in philosophy of law, followed by consideration of a range of theoretical issues in general criminal law.

PLS 30302-01 | x | Polit. & Const. Theory
Planinc, Emma| MW 9:30am-10:45pm

An approach to understanding the fundamental problems of political community and the nature of various solutions, especially that of democracy. Readings will include, but are not limited to, Aristotle's Politics, Locke's Second Treatise, and selections from The Federalist Papers and American founding documents. Spring.

PLS 30302-02 | x | Polit. & Const. Theory
Planinc, Emma| MW 11:00am-12:15pm

An approach to understanding the fundamental problems of political community and the nature of various solutions, especially that of democracy. Readings will include, but are not limited to, Aristotle's Politics, Locke's Second Treatise, and selections from The Federalist Papers and American founding documents. Spring.