Spring 2020 Courses

Spring 2020 Course List

Gateway Course: to be offered 20/21 Academic year. Seniors needing gateway course credit, please contact Jen Smith jsmith70@nd.edu

Elective Course offerings for Spring 2020:

Electives are divided by topic for organizational purposes only.  Students may take electives from any category. Click heading for course descriptions.

American Founding & American Constitutional History






















Course Title

CNST#


CNST CRN

Primary # Primary CRN Instructor Time Location
American Politics

CNST 20002

24068
POLS 20100
22437 Campbell, David TTh 9:30am-10:45am DeBartolo Hall 155
Black Politics in Multiracial America

CNST 30023

TBD
AFTS 43644
30838 Pinderhughes, Dianne MW 3:30pm-4:45pm DeBartolo Hall 246
Sophomore Seminar: Southern Politics X x

POLS 33002-01

31148 Kaplan, Joshua MW 11:00am-12:15pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B066
Senior Seminar: The Politics of
Presidential Impeachment
X x

POLS 53002-02

21669 Perez-Linan, Anibal MW 5:05pm-6:20pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B079

Comparative Constitutionalism & International Law


























Course Title

CNST#


CNST CRN

Primary # Primary CRN Instructor Time Location
World Politics Intro to Comparative Politics

CNST 20200

23862
POLS 20400
21289 Gould, Andrew MW 9:25am-10:15am Corbett Family Hall E720
International Law

CNST 30200

27479
POLS 30220
27478 Powell, Emilia Justyna, Rothkopf llana TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm DeBartolo Hall 119
Catholicism and Politics

CNST 30215

32048
POLS 30654
31145 Philpott, James TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm DeBartolo Hall 215
Varieties of Democracy

CNST 30244

32086
POLS 30497
31143 Coppedge, Michael TTh 2pm-3:15pm DeBartolo Hall 224

Constitutional Government & Public Policy


















































Course Title

CNST#


CNST CRN

Primary # Primary CRN Instructor Time Location
Introduction to Criminology

CNST 20403

25762
SOC 20732
22005 Martinez-Schuldt, Ricardo MW 3:30pm-4:45pm DeBartolo Hall 155
Presidential Leadership

CNST 30400

32050
POLS 30001
30772 Arnold, Peri TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm DeBartolo Hall 224
Federalism & the Constitution            

CNST 30401

32045
POLS 30067
31130 Barber, Sotirios TTh 11am-12:15pm DeBartolo Hall 149
Free Speech

CNST 30419

32046
POLS 30077
31132 Hall, Matthew TTh 2pm-3:15pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B062
Reinventing Government

CNST 30422

28804
HESB 30330
27801 Mueller, Paul TTh 9:30am-10:45am DeBartolo Hall 223
Civil Rights in America

CNST 30425

32085
AMST 30189
31680 Cajka, Peter TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm Geddes Hall B034
Politics of Reproduction

CNST 30426

32177
GSC 30623
30801 Butler, Pamela TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm O’Shaughnessy Hall 345
Moot Court: Equal Protection

CNST 40405

32049
POLS 40075     
31149 Hall, Matthew TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B032
The Policy-Making Process X x HESB  43897         27805 Ramirez, Ricardo MW 11:00am-12:15pm DeBartolo Hall 206

Constitutional History and Philosophy




























































































Course Title

CNST#


CNST CRN

Primary # Primary CRN Instructor Time Location
Political Theory

CNST 20602

23863
POLS 20600
21291 Verdeja, Ernesto TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm Debartolo Hall 131
Political Philosophy

CNST 20611

32083
PHIL 20441
31861 Jensen, Ross MW 11am-12:15pm Flanner Hall 925
History of Rome II: The Empire

CNST 20615

32081
CLAS 20203
31005 Hernandez, David MW 12:50pm-1:40pm DeBartolo Hall 116
Faith, Politics, Spirituality

CNST 20616

32176
THEO 20851
31267 Ashley, James
MWF 9:25am-10:15am
O’Shaughnessy Hall 109
Rise and Fall of Dem. & Dictator

CNST 30612

32047
POLS 30415
31139 Mainwaring, Scott MW 3:30pm-4:45pm Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B071
17th Century England

CNST 30622

32051
HIST 30412
31068 Rapple, Rory TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm DeBartolo Hall 203
Fdns. of Constitutional Order

CNST 30638

31108     Collins, Susan; Staysa, Abigail TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm DeBartolo Hall 241
Democracy Ancient and Modern

CNST 30639

32082
CLAS 30117
31010 Mazurek, Tadeusz MW 3:30pm-4:45pm O’Shaugnessy Hall 118
Radical Politics

CNST 43604

32084
PHIL 43429 
31566 Rush, Fred TTh 2pm-3:15pm DeBartolo Hall 244
Intro to Philosophy: Ethics and Politics X x

PHIL 10105-01

25818 Sterba, James
MWF 10:30am-11:20am
O’Shaughnessy Hall 110
Intro to Philosophy: Ethics and Politics X x

PHIL 10105-02

26678 Sterba, James
MWF 12:50pm-1:40pm
O’Shaughnessy Hall 110
Philosophy of Law X x

PHIL 20408-01

31548 Warfield, Ted MW 12:50pm-1:40pm Niewland Science Hall 123
Philosophy of Law X x

PHIL 20408-02

31705 Warfield, Ted MW 12:50pm-1:40pm Niewland Science Hall 123
Philosophy of Law X x

PHIL 20408-03

31706 Warfield, Ted MW 12:50pm-1:40pm Niewland Science Hall 123
Philosophical Issues in Law and Medicine X x

PHIL 43324

31565 Warfield, Ted MW 11:00am-12:15pm Hammes Mowbray Hall 313
Philosophical Issues in Law and Medicine X x

PHIL 43324

32174 Warfield, Ted MW 11:00am-12:15pm Hammes Mowbray Hall 313
Catholic Social Teaching X x

CST 40001

31345 Pfeil, Margaret MW 12:30pm-1:45pm Main Building 303
Senior Seminar: Constitutional Interpretation x x

POLS 53002-04

22633 Barber, Sotirios TR 2:00pm-3:15pm DeBartolo Hall 347

 

American Founding & American Constitutional History

American Politics | CNST 20002 – 24068 | POLS 20100 – 22437
Campbell, David | TTh 9:30am-10:45am | DeBartolo Hall 155
This course surveys the basic institutions and practices of American politics. The goal of the course is to gain a more systematic understanding of American politics that will help you become better informed and more articulate. The course examines the institutional and constitutional framework of American politics and identifies the key ideas needed to understand politics today. The reading and writing assignments have been designed not only to inform you, but also to help develop your analytic and research skills. The themes of the course include the logic and consequences of the separation of powers, the build-in biases of institutions and procedures, the origins and consequence of political reforms, and recent changes in American politics in the 21st century. This semester we will emphasize the significance of the upcoming 2016 elections, and the course will include election-related assignments. Although the course counts toward the Political Science major and will prepare prospective majors for further study of American politics, its primary aim is to introduce students of all backgrounds and interests to the information, ideas, and academic skills that will enable them to understand American politics better and help them become more thoughtful and responsible citizens.

Black Politics in Multiracial America | CNST 30023 – | AFTS 43644– 30838
Pinderhughes, Dianne | MW 3:30pm-4:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 246
This course undertakes a broad examination of black politics in multiracial America. Racial issues have provoked crises in American politics; changes in racial status have prompted American political institutions to operate in distinctive ways. The course examines the interface of black politics with and within the American political system. How successful have blacks been as they attempted to penetrate the electoral system in the post civil rights era. What conflicts and controversies have arisen as African Americans have sought to integrate the American system of power. Now that the laws have been changed to permit limited integration, should African Americans integrate politically, that is should they attempt to ‘deracialize’ their political appeals and strategy, with an effort to “crossover politically;” are some approaches such as those of President Barack Obama “not black enough?” What internal political challenges do African Americans face; some such as the increasing importance of class and socioeconomic factors, as well as gender and sexuality may reshape the definition of the black community. What intellectual challenges and strategic choices are they facing as the American population has grown increasingly multiracial. Finally, in light of these demographic changes in American life and American politics, how stable will past patterns of political participation, and political organizations and institutions of African American politics remain.

Sophomore Seminar: Southern Politics | POLS 33002-01– 31148
Kaplan, Joshua | MW 11:00am-12:15pm | enkins and Nanovic Hall B066
Sophomore seminars provide sophomore Political Science majors with the opportunity to take an advanced, more demanding course earlier. They are designed to go into a topic in greater depth and introduce students to basic research techniques that will help them do original work. Topics vary from semester to semester. The course fulfills a seminar requirement for the Political Science major. Department approval is required.

Senior Seminar: The Politics of Presidential Impeachment | POLS 53002-02– 21669
Perez-Linan, Anibal | MW 5:05pm-6:20pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B079
Writing seminars are devoted to a specialized topic. These seminars give students a chance to take an advanced course in a seminar setting, with an emphasis on research skills and discussion. The individual topic of each seminar can be found on the political science web page listing of course descriptions. The course will fulfill a writing seminar requirement for the major and is restricted to senior political science majors only, but will be opened to junior political science majors beginning the 1st day of junior course registration.

Comparative Constitutionalism & International Law

World Politics Intro to Comp | CNST 20200– 23862 | POLS 20400– 21289
Gould, Andrew | MW 9:25am-10:15am | Corbett Family Hall E720         
This course will focus on the relationship between democratic institutions, peace, and economic/human development. While drawing on lessons from North America and Europe, we will focus largely on countries of Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. During the semester, we will discuss and debate the merits of various explanations or hypotheses that political scientists have proposed to answer the following questions: Why are some countries more “developed” and democratic than others? Is development necessary for democracy or democracy necessary for development? What is the relationship between culture, development, and democracy? How do different types of political institutions affect the prospects for development and democracy? Should/how should U.S. and other established democracies promote democratization? By the end of the course, the objectives are that students (1) learn the most important theories intended to explain why some countries are more democratic and “developed” than others, (2) understand the complexity of any relationship between democracy and development, and (3) grow in the ability to think about and intelligently assess the strengths and weaknesses of strategies intended to promote democracy and development.

International Law | CNST 30200– 27479 | POLS 30220– 27478
Powell, Emilia Justyna, Rothkopf llana  | TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm  |  DeBartolo Hall 119   
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to international law. In the beginning of the semester, we will focus on general characteristics of international law, such as its historical development, main thinkers, subjects, and sources of law. Second, we will study several substantive areas of international law, such as human rights, international criminal law, diplomacy, and peaceful resolution of disputes. Next, we will examine international courts, such as the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice. We will conclude the course by analyzing international law through the lenses of domestic legal systems. Upon completion of this course, students should be familiar with the main features of international law and its historical development.

Catholicism and Politics | CNST 30215– 32048 | POLS 30654– 31145
Philpott, James | TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 215       
Catholicism and Politics poses the question, both simple and complex: How ought Catholics to think about the political order and political issues within it? The first part of the course will survey major responses to this question drawn from Church history: the early church, the medieval church, and the modern church. The second part applies these models to contemporary issues ranging among war, intervention, globalization, abortion, the death penalty, religious freedom, gender issues, and economic development. The course culminates in “Vatican III,” where teams of students, representing church factions, gather to discover church teachings on selected controversial political issues.

Varieties of Democracy | CNST 30244– 32086 | POLS 30497– 31143
Coppedge, Michael | TTh 2pm-3:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 224
The world’s largest collection of information about the state of democracy all over the world resides at the University of Notre Dame. This course is a guided exploration of the Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem) data. It begins with a survey of the varied ways that philosophers and cultures have thought about democracy. It then explains how these traditions were distilled into a lengthy questionnaire answered by more than a thousand country experts all over the world. The course provides you will the methodological tools you need to explore the data in depth to answer questions such as: What does it mean to be “democratic”? Are there different types of democracy in the world? What are the different ways of being undemocratic? Which countries and regions are most and least democratic in each way? What trends can we observe over the past century? Are there sequences of reforms that lead to successful democratization? As the database is still growing, many students will have the opportunity to contribute to the data collection process. You will also supplement the data with independent research to produce a detailed report evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the political regime in one country and placing it in comparative and historical perspective.

Constitutional Government & Public Policy                                                                          

Introduction to Criminology  | CNST 20403– 25762 | SOC 20732– 22005
Martinez-Schuldt, Ricardo | MW 3:30pm-4:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 155   
Introduction to Criminology provides students with an overview of the sociological study of law making, law breaking and the resulting social responses. In this class we not only look at a variety of crimes, but we also discuss the varying methods sociologists use to collect, interpret and evaluate data, as well as how we theorize about crime and punishment. We address questions such as “Why are some people or groups labeled as criminal, while others are not?” “Do laws in both their construction and enforcement serve everyone’s interests equally?” “How can the communities in which people are embedded be considered as criminogenic?” “How are poverty, race, gender and other social factors related to crime?”

Presidential Leadership | CNST 30400– 32050 | POLS 30001– 30772
Arnold, Peri | TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 224
This course examines the role of the presidency in the American regime and its change over time. Particular attention will be given to expectations about presidential leadership through the course of American political history. Beginning with questions about the original design and role of the presidency, the course turns to consideration of the role of leadership styles for change and continuity in American politics. Finally, cases of presidential leadership are studied to comprehend the way leadership and political context interact.

Federalism & the Constitution | CNST 30401  – 32045 | POLS 30067– 31130
Barber, Sotirios | TTh 11am-12:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 149
This course takes up our oldest and perhaps our most pervasive constitutional problem: the proper relationship between the powers of the national government and the powers of the states. The root of this problem lies in the kind of country and people the Constitution commits us to be. Its many branches include political and legal questions relating to the regulation of the economy, federal power over the nation’s morals, race relations in America, the nature of community in America and the nation’s obligation to the poor. This course is designed for undergraduates with a background in American national government and an introductory course in constitutional studies. Main text for the course is A. J. Bellia, Federalism. Course grade based on mid-term and final exams, with optional term paper.

Free Speech | CNST 30419– 32046 | POLS 30077– 31132
Hall, Matthew | TTh 2pm-3:15pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B062
This course examines the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and its interpretation in American constitutional law. Students will participate in Socratic method discussions, class debates, and moot court exercises, in which students play the role of lawyers and justices arguing a Supreme Court case. Through these activities, students will explore the freedom of speech as it relates to sedition, libel, invasion of privacy, obscenity, commercial speech, broadcasting, and the internet.

Reinventing Government | NST 30422– 28804 | HESB 30330– 27801
Mueller, Paul | TTh 9:30am-10:45am | DeBartolo Hall 223
Since World War II, many presidential candidates have campaigned on promises to make government more efficient, delivering services to individuals more cheaply, faster, and with fewer errors. We will explore the attempts made to re-invent the federal bureaucracy since the advent of the spoils system with Andrew Jackson’s presidential victory in 1828. We will examine the regulatory challenges presented to local, state and federal governments by the Industrial Revolution and how government responded. Finally, we will examine critically, the various initiatives of the last quarter century to improve or re-invent the delivery of public goods. This class will provide the student with the tools to understand the challenges of public administration, measure the effectiveness of various improvement initiatives, diagnose potential maladies within the current system and effectively communicate those findings others.

Civil Rights in America | CNST 30425– 32085 | AMST 30189– 31680
Cajka, Peter | TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | Geddes Hall B034
This course explores the Black Freedom Struggle from the Civil Rights Movement to Black Power and into Black Lives Matter. How have African Americans mobilized to secure recognition of human dignity from the American Political system? How did the Freedom Struggle shape American culture? By studying the Civil Rights Movement in America, this class opens up conversation on the central issues of American history: race, racism, rights, and freedom.

Politics of Reproduction | CNST 30426– 32177 | GSC 30623– 30801
Butler, Pamela            | TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 345
Moving beyond a simplistic “pro-choice versus pro-life” framework, this course invites students to study the complex ways in which reproduction is political – how fertility, pregnancy, childbirth, abortion, adoption, parenting, and caregiving are defined by power relations, shaped by material conditions, and linked with the unequal distribution of resources and life chances on a global scale. What factors influence a person’s ability to have children, to not have children, and to raise children they do have in safe and sustainable communities? How do the structural violences of capitalism, racism, ableism, and imperialism shape meanings and experiences of reproduction in the U.S., in local contexts around the world, and across national borders? How have diverse social movements organized to fight reproductive oppression and to build more just futures? Our exploration of these questions will lead us to a wide variety of historical and contemporary sites where reproduction intersects with systems of power and practices of resistance. At the heart of our inquiry will be the understanding, established by gender studies scholars and activists, that reproduction is a key aspect of social justice, and we will focus in particular on the intersections of gender and sexuality with economic, racial, environmental, and decolonial justice. Students will contribute to the course syllabus by sharing their own research on contemporary issues, policy, and activism. Our learning will be discussion-based, collaborative, and exploratory.

Moot Court: Equal Protection |CNST 40405– 32049 | POLS 40075– 31149
Hall, Matthew |TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B032
This course will explore the development of modern equal protection law through a series of moot court exercises. Students will play the role of lawyers and justices and retry famous Supreme Court cases from American history on five topics: school desegregation, sex discrimination, disparate impact, affirmative action, and sexual orientation discrimination. The course is intended to (1) provide students with a firm understanding of the complicated legal issues involved in modern equal protection controversies, (2) help students develop effective and persuasive communication skills, (3) familiarize students with the challenges of building a fair and respectful society, (4) encourage students to promote social justice in their own communities, and (5) challenge students to think carefully about their own views on civil rights. “Interested students should contact the instructor.”

The Policy-Making Process | HESB 43897– 27805
Ramirez, Ricardo | MW 11:00am-12:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 206
This course examines the public policy-making process at the federal, state, and local levels. Students will explore a specific policy problem affecting the South Bend metropolitan area. The goal will be to write and present a policy brief to local decision-makers in public policy.

Constitutional History and Philosophy

Political Theory  | CNST 20602– 23863 | POLS 20600– 21291
Verdeja, Ernesto | TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm | Debartolo Hall 131
This course is an introduction to political theory as a tradition of discourse and as a way of thinking about politics. The course surveys selected works of political theory and explores some of the recurring themes and questions that political theory addresses, especially the question of justice. This introductory course fulfils the political theory breadth requirement for the political science major.

Political Philosophy  | CNST 20611– 32083 | PHIL 20441– 31861
Jensen, Ross | MW 11am-12:15pm | Flanner Hall 925
In this course, we will ask how we should understand the social ideals of freedom and equality, and how these ideals should be realized in a just society. To help us approach these questions, we will read a series of major philosophical works from the last fifty years, each of which falls within a distinct tradition of political thought. The traditions represented by the works we will read are liberalism, libertarianism, socialism, and anarchism. We will consider the alleged strengths and weaknesses of each tradition’s distinctive approach to political justice, and explore each tradition’s implications for current political controversies. Which particular controversies we focus on will be determined, in part, by a class vote. Students majoring or minoring in political science, economics, sociology, or peace studies may be especially interested in this course.

History of Rome II: The Empire | CNST 20615– 32081 | CLAS 20203– 31005
Hernandez, David | MW 12:50pm-1:40pm | DeBartolo Hall 116
This course examines the history of the Roman Empire, from the establishment of a veiled monarchy under Augustus to the Christianization of the empire following the reign of Constantine (ca. 1st century B.C. to 5th century A.D). Throughout the course, we will analyze and interpret ancient textual and archaeological evidence, from both Italy and the provinces, to assess the multi-faceted institutions and cultures of the Roman people. This body of material includes the writings of emperors (Augustus, Marcus Aurelius) and ancient historians (Tacitus, Suetonius, Ammianus Marcellinus), as well as the personal letters of Pliny to the emperor Trajan. Major themes discussed in the course include the nature of despotism, dynasties and the problem of succession; imperial governance of the Mediterranean (central, provincial, and local); cultural diversity and acculturation (so-called “Romanization”); religions and the imperial cult (worship of the Roman emperor); citizenship; urbanism, politics, and the economy; mortality and ecology; and the discrepant identities of women, children, slaves, freedmen, and freeborn under the imperial system of Rome.

Faith, Politics, Spirituality | CNST 20616– 32176 | THEO 20851– 31267
Ashley, James | MWF 9:25am-10:15am | O’Shaughnessy Hall 109
This course reflects on how Christians have understood and enacted the synergies and tensions between the commitments that come from their faith and the commitments that arise out of the civil and political communities to which they belong. We look both at important texts through history written by figures such as Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, and Bartolome de las Casas, and also at exemplary figures over the past century who have given courageous witness to the difference that faith can make in difficult political times, including Cesar Chavez, Thomas Merton, Franz Jagerstatter, Dorothy Day, and Oscar Romero.

Rise and Fall of Dem. & Dictator | CNST 30612– 32047 | POLS 30415– 31139
Mainwaring, Scott | MW 3:30pm-4:45pm | Jenkins and Nanovic Hall B071
Winston Churchill famously said in a speech in the House of Commons in 1947, “Democracy is the worst form of government except for all those others that have been tried.” For generations, social scientists have studied what makes democracy emerge and then survive or break down. And because some dictatorships have huge consequences for their own populations and the world, social scientists have also devoted considerable attention to analyzing the emergence, survival, and breakdown of authoritarian and totalitarian regimes. This course will examine these issues. The first part of the course will examine different theoretical approaches to understanding why democracies and dictatorships emerge and then survive or fall. The second and longer part will focus on the emergence, survival, and fall of democracies and dictatorships in Europe and Latin America, mostly in the 20th century.

17th Century England | CNST 30622– 32051 | HIST 30412– 31068
Rapple, Rory | TTh 12:30pm-1:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 203
England’s seventeenth century provides one of the most compelling epochs of human history, full of a cast of remarkable characters. Once Elizabeth I died in 1603, a new dynasty, the Scottish royal house, the Stuarts, came to the throne in the person of James VI & I. A new political dynamic ensued. Insoluble tensions arose between perceived licentiousness in high politics on one hand and puritan moral rigour on the other, between royal control of religion and a hankering after policies based on literal Biblical interpretation and also between a gaping royal treasury and public reluctance to contribute financially to the realm. These, and other factors, resulted in the unthinkable: the dissolution of the ties that had held English politics and society together. The Civil War (or “Great Rebellion”, or “Puritan Revolution” depending on the interpretation favoured) that resulted gave rise to a welter of new constitutional ideas, religious experiments and virulent anti-Catholicism. These were all set loose as King and Parliament fought for domination of the country. We will pay particular attention to the figure of Oliver Cromwell, who came to command English politics both before and after the hitherto unimaginable public execution of the king (who many believed was God’s anointed). We will also ask why the English after allowing their king to be executed and their toleration a substantial Interregnum subsequently restored Charles II, their erstwhile king’s son, as monarch. Remarkable figures that we will encounter and evaluate include the Leveller John Lilburne, the poet John Milton, Praise-God Barebones (yes, that is a name) and the libidinous Samuel Pepys.

Fdns. of Constitutional Order | CNST 30638– 31108
Collins, Susan; Staysa, Abigail  | TTh 3:30pm-4:45pm | DeBartolo Hall 241
This seminar-style course will examine foundational questions of constitutional order. We will begin from debates about the nature of political society among contemporary thinkers, J’rgen Habermas, Pope Benedict, John Rawls, and Carl Schmitt. We will then focus on key Ancient, Medieval, and Modern thinkers: Aristotle, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and the Federalist writers. Our aim will be to attain clarity about the questions that are fundamental to every constitutional order, especially the character of our “original” or pre-political condition, the status of war and peace, the nature of political authority and law, and the proper ends of political community. This course also serves as a gateway course for the Constitutional Studies Minor.

Democracy Ancient and Modern | CNST 30639– 32082 | CLAS 30117– 31010
Mazurek, Tadeusz | MW 3:30pm-4:45pm | O’Shaugnessy Hall 118
This course examines the theory, practice, and development of ancient Greco-Roman democracy. Particular attention is devoted to comparing ancient with modern forms of self-rule. Among the special topics studied are the origins of Greek democracy, its advantages and disadvantages as a form of government, alternatives to democracy, and democracy as an abiding legacy of classical civilization for the modern world. Familiarity with ancient Greco-Roman history is recommended, but not required.

Radical Politics | CNST 43604– 32084 | PHIL 43429– 31566
Rush, Fred | TTh 2pm-3:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 244
Analysis of philosophical and public policy issues at the intersection of law and medicine. Topics may include: the “born alive” rule, defining death, the vegetative state and other disorders of consciousness, assisted suicide, futility laws, and others.

Intro to Philosophy: Ethics and Politics | PHIL 10105-01– 25818
Sterba, James | MWF 10:30am-11:20am | O’Shaughnessy Hall 110
Intro to Philosophy: Ethics and Politics | PHIL 10105-02– 26678
Sterba, James | MWF 12:50pm-1:40pm | O’Shaughnessy Hall 110          
This course will be an introduction to philosophy with a special focus on issues in moral and political philosophy. Topics to be discussed may include justice, the nature of the good, eudaemonic and hedonic conceptions of happiness, virtue, ethical theory, moral relativism, feminist ethics, liberty, equality, and the foundations of rights, as well as particular applied topics in moral and political philosophy (such as economic justice and the ethics of war).

Philosophy of Law | PHIL 20408-01– 31548
Warfield, Ted | MW 12:50pm-1:40pm | Niewland Science Hall 123
Philosophy of Law | PHIL 20408-02– 31705
Warfield, Ted | MW 12:50pm-1:40pm | Niewland Science Hall 123        
Philosophy of Law | PHIL 20408-03– 31706
Warfield, Ted | MW 12:50pm-1:40pm | Niewland Science Hall 123        
This course explores theoretical and practical issues arising in law. Topics will include some of the following: laws regulating speech; drug laws, the limits of the criminal sanction, and the debate about over-criminalization; self-defense; the foundations of criminal procedure.In class mid-term and short paper for each of the 3 class units.Regular attendance and participation in required Friday class discussion section.

Philosophical Issues in Law and Medicine | PHIL 43324– 31565
Warfield, Ted | MW 11:00am-12:15pm | Hammes Mowbray Hall 313
Philosophical Issues in Law and Medicine | PHIL 43324– 32174
Warfield, Ted | MW 11:00am-12:15pm | Hammes Mowbray Hall 313    
Analysis of philosophical and public policy issues at the intersection of law and medicine. Topics may include: the “born alive” rule, defining death, the vegetative state and other disorders of consciousness, assisted suicide, futility laws, and others.

Catholic Social Teaching | CST 40001– 31345
Pfeil, Margaret | MW 12:30pm-1:45pm | Main Building 303
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the tradition of Catholic social teaching with a view to developing skills for critical reading and appropriation of these documents. We will examine papal, conciliar, and episcopal texts from Rerum novarum (1891) up to the present time, identifying operative principles, tracing central theological, ethical, and ecclesial concerns, and locating each document in its proper historical context.

Senior Seminar: Constitutional Interpretation | POLS 53002-04– 22633
Barber, Sotirios  | TR 2:00pm-3:15pm | DeBartolo Hall 347
Writing seminars are devoted to a specialized topic. These seminars give students a chance to take an advanced course in a seminar setting, with an emphasis on research skills and discussion. The individual topic of each seminar can be found on the political science web page listing of course descriptions. The course will fulfill a writing seminar requirement for the major and is restricted to senior political science majors only, but will be opened to junior political science majors beginning the 1st day of junior course registration.